Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species: An old world origin for a new world disease?

B. A. Ellis, R. L. Regnery, L. Beati, F. Bacellar, M. Rood, G. G. Glass, E. Marston, T. G. Ksiazek, D. Jones, J. E. Childs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bartonella species were isolated from the blood of 63 of 325 Rattus norvegicus and 11 of 92 Rattus rattus from 13 sites in the United States and Portugal. Infection in both Rattus species ranged from 0% (e.g., 0/87) to ~60% (e.g., 35/62). A 337-bp fragment of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction was sequenced from all 74 isolates. Isolates from R. norvegicus were most similar to Bartonella elizabethae, isolated previously from a patient with endocardil is (93%-100% sequence similarity), followed by Bartonella grahamii and other Bartonella species isolated from Old World rodents (Clethrionomys species, Mus musculus, and Rattus species). These data suggest that Rattus species are a reservoir host for pathogenic Bartonella species and are consistent with a hypothesized Old World origin for Bartonella species recovered from Rattus species introduced into the Americas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-224
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Bartonella
Introduced Species
Citrate (si)-Synthase
Arvicolinae
Portugal
Rodentia
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Ellis, B. A., Regnery, R. L., Beati, L., Bacellar, F., Rood, M., Glass, G. G., ... Childs, J. E. (1999). Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species: An old world origin for a new world disease? Journal of Infectious Diseases, 180(1), 220-224. https://doi.org/10.1086/314824

Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species : An old world origin for a new world disease? / Ellis, B. A.; Regnery, R. L.; Beati, L.; Bacellar, F.; Rood, M.; Glass, G. G.; Marston, E.; Ksiazek, T. G.; Jones, D.; Childs, J. E.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 180, No. 1, 1999, p. 220-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ellis, BA, Regnery, RL, Beati, L, Bacellar, F, Rood, M, Glass, GG, Marston, E, Ksiazek, TG, Jones, D & Childs, JE 1999, 'Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species: An old world origin for a new world disease?', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 180, no. 1, pp. 220-224. https://doi.org/10.1086/314824
Ellis, B. A. ; Regnery, R. L. ; Beati, L. ; Bacellar, F. ; Rood, M. ; Glass, G. G. ; Marston, E. ; Ksiazek, T. G. ; Jones, D. ; Childs, J. E. / Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species : An old world origin for a new world disease?. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 180, No. 1. pp. 220-224.
@article{023f0f5d2328469d8d430376bb849889,
title = "Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species: An old world origin for a new world disease?",
abstract = "Bartonella species were isolated from the blood of 63 of 325 Rattus norvegicus and 11 of 92 Rattus rattus from 13 sites in the United States and Portugal. Infection in both Rattus species ranged from 0{\%} (e.g., 0/87) to ~60{\%} (e.g., 35/62). A 337-bp fragment of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction was sequenced from all 74 isolates. Isolates from R. norvegicus were most similar to Bartonella elizabethae, isolated previously from a patient with endocardil is (93{\%}-100{\%} sequence similarity), followed by Bartonella grahamii and other Bartonella species isolated from Old World rodents (Clethrionomys species, Mus musculus, and Rattus species). These data suggest that Rattus species are a reservoir host for pathogenic Bartonella species and are consistent with a hypothesized Old World origin for Bartonella species recovered from Rattus species introduced into the Americas.",
author = "Ellis, {B. A.} and Regnery, {R. L.} and L. Beati and F. Bacellar and M. Rood and Glass, {G. G.} and E. Marston and Ksiazek, {T. G.} and D. Jones and Childs, {J. E.}",
year = "1999",
doi = "10.1086/314824",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "180",
pages = "220--224",
journal = "Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "0022-1899",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rats of the genus Rattus are reservoir hosts for pathogenic Bartonella species

T2 - An old world origin for a new world disease?

AU - Ellis, B. A.

AU - Regnery, R. L.

AU - Beati, L.

AU - Bacellar, F.

AU - Rood, M.

AU - Glass, G. G.

AU - Marston, E.

AU - Ksiazek, T. G.

AU - Jones, D.

AU - Childs, J. E.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Bartonella species were isolated from the blood of 63 of 325 Rattus norvegicus and 11 of 92 Rattus rattus from 13 sites in the United States and Portugal. Infection in both Rattus species ranged from 0% (e.g., 0/87) to ~60% (e.g., 35/62). A 337-bp fragment of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction was sequenced from all 74 isolates. Isolates from R. norvegicus were most similar to Bartonella elizabethae, isolated previously from a patient with endocardil is (93%-100% sequence similarity), followed by Bartonella grahamii and other Bartonella species isolated from Old World rodents (Clethrionomys species, Mus musculus, and Rattus species). These data suggest that Rattus species are a reservoir host for pathogenic Bartonella species and are consistent with a hypothesized Old World origin for Bartonella species recovered from Rattus species introduced into the Americas.

AB - Bartonella species were isolated from the blood of 63 of 325 Rattus norvegicus and 11 of 92 Rattus rattus from 13 sites in the United States and Portugal. Infection in both Rattus species ranged from 0% (e.g., 0/87) to ~60% (e.g., 35/62). A 337-bp fragment of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction was sequenced from all 74 isolates. Isolates from R. norvegicus were most similar to Bartonella elizabethae, isolated previously from a patient with endocardil is (93%-100% sequence similarity), followed by Bartonella grahamii and other Bartonella species isolated from Old World rodents (Clethrionomys species, Mus musculus, and Rattus species). These data suggest that Rattus species are a reservoir host for pathogenic Bartonella species and are consistent with a hypothesized Old World origin for Bartonella species recovered from Rattus species introduced into the Americas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033016335&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033016335&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/314824

DO - 10.1086/314824

M3 - Article

C2 - 10353885

AN - SCOPUS:0033016335

VL - 180

SP - 220

EP - 224

JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

IS - 1

ER -