Rapid determination of COL2A1 mutations in individuals with stickler syndrome: Analysis of potential premature termination codons

Douglas J. Wilkin, Ruth Liberfarb, Joie Davis, Howard P. Levy, William G. Cole, Clair A. Francomano, Daniel H. Cohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stickler syndrome is one of the milder phenotypes resulting from mutations in the gene that encodes type-II collagen, COL2A1. All COL2A1 mutations known to cause Stickler syndrome result in the formation of a premature termination codon within the type-II collagen gene. COL2A1 has 10 inframe CGA codons, which can mutate to TGA STOP codons via a methylation-deamination mechanism. We have analyzed these sites in genomic DNA from a panel of 40 Stickler syndrome patients to test the hypothesis that mutations that cause Stickler syndrome preferentially occur at these bases. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genomic DNA containing each of the in-frame CGA codons was done by one of two methods: either using primers that amplify DNA that includes the CGA codon, or using allele-specific primers that either amplify normal sequence containing a CGA codon or amplify a mutant sequence containing a TGA codon. Analysis of PCR products by restriction endonuclease digestion or sequencing demonstrated the presence of a normal or mutated codon. TGA mutations were identified in eight patients, at five of the 10 in-frame CGA codons. The identification of these mutations in eight of 40 patients demonstrates that these sites are common sites for mutations in individuals with Stickler syndrome and, we propose, should be analyzed as a first step in the search for mutations that result in this disorder. Published 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-148
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics
Volume94
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nonsense Codon
Codon
Mutation
Collagen Type II
Terminator Codon
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Deamination
DNA Primers
DNA
DNA Restriction Enzymes
Type 1 Stickler syndrome
Methylation
Genes
Digestion
Alleles
Phenotype

Keywords

  • COL2A1
  • Mutation
  • Premature termination codon
  • Stickler syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Rapid determination of COL2A1 mutations in individuals with stickler syndrome : Analysis of potential premature termination codons. / Wilkin, Douglas J.; Liberfarb, Ruth; Davis, Joie; Levy, Howard P.; Cole, William G.; Francomano, Clair A.; Cohn, Daniel H.

In: American Journal of Medical Genetics, Vol. 94, No. 2, 2000, p. 141-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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