Ranibizumab for macular edema due to retinal vein occlusions: Long-term follow-up in the HORIZON trial

Jeffrey S. Heier, Peter A. Campochiaro, Linda Yau, Zhengrong Li, Namrata Saroj, Roman G. Rubio, Phillip Lai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To assess long-term safety and efficacy of intraocular ranibizumab injections in patients with macular edema after retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Design: Open-label extension trial of the 12-month Ranibizumab for the Treatment of Macular Edema following Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety (BRAVO) and Central Retinal Vein Occlusion Study: Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety (CRUISE) trials. Participants: We included 304 patients who completed BRAVO and 304 patients who completed CRUISE. Methods: Patients were seen at least every 3 months and given an intraocular injection of 0.5 mg ranibizumab if they met prespecified retreatment criteria. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes were incidence and severity of ocular and nonocular adverse events (AEs). Key efficacy outcomes included mean change from baseline best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) letter score by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study protocol and central foveal thickness. Results: In patients who completed month 12, the mean number of injections (excluding month 12 injection) in the sham/0.5-, 0.3/0.5-, and 0.5-mg groups was 2.0, 2.4, and 2.1 (branch RVO) and 2.9, 3.8, and 3.5 (central RVO), respectively. The incidence of study eye ocular serious AEs (SAEs) and SAEs potentially related to systemic vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition across treatment arms was 2% to 9% and 1% to 6%, respectively. The mean change from baseline BCVA letter score at month 12 in branch RVO patients was 0.9 (sham/0.5 mg), -2.3 (0.3/0.5 mg), and -0.7 (0.5 mg), respectively. The mean change from baseline BCVA at month 12 in central RVO patients was -4.2 (sham/0.5 mg), -5.2 (0.3/0.5 mg), and -4.1 (0.5 mg), respectively. Conclusions: No new safety events were identified with long-term use of ranibizumab; rates of SAEs potentially related to treatment were consistent with prior ranibizumab trials. Reduced follow-up and fewer ranibizumab injections in the second year of treatment were associated with a decline in vision in central RVO patients, but vision in branch RVO patients remained stable. Results suggest that during the second year of ranibizumab treatment of RVO patients, follow-up and injections should be individualized and, on average, central RVO patients may require more frequent follow-up than every 3 months. Financial Disclosure(s): Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)802-809
Number of pages8
JournalOphthalmology
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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