Randomized controlled pilot study testing use of smartphone technology for obesity treatment

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Abstract

Background. The established interventions for weight loss are resource intensive which can create barriers for full participation and ultimate translation. The major goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of theoretically based behavioral interventions delivered by smartphone technology. Methods. The study randomized 68 obese adults to receive one of four interventions for six months: (1) intensive counseling intervention, (2) intensive counseling plus smartphone intervention, (3) a less intensive counseling plus smartphone intervention, and (4) smartphone intervention only. The outcome measures of weight, BMI, waist circumference, and self-reported dietary intake and physical activity were assessed at baseline and six months. Results. The sample was 78% female and 49% African American, with an average age of 45 years, and average BMI of 34.3 kg/m2. There were trends for differences in weight loss among the four intervention groups. Participants in the intensive counseling plus self-monitoring smartphone group and less intensive counseling plus self-monitoring smartphone group tended to lose more weight than other groups (5.4 kg and 3.3 kg, resp.). Conclusions. The results of this pilot trial of a weight loss intervention provide preliminary support for using a smartphone application for self-monitoring as an adjunct to behavioral counseling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number151597
JournalJournal of Obesity
Volume2013
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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