Ramp study hemodynamics, functional capacity, and outcome in heart failure patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices

Mette H. Jung, Finn Gustafsson, Brian Houston, Stuart D. Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ramp studies - measuring changes in cardiac parameters as a function of serial pump speed changes (revolutions per minute [rpm]) - are increasingly used to evaluate function and malfunction of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). We hypothesized that ramp studies can predict functional capacity, quality of life (QOL), and survival in CF-LVAD patients. Hemodynamic changes per Δrpm were measured at a minimum of CF-LVAD support, at baseline pump speed, and at maximal tolerable pump speed. Subsequently functional capacity and QOL were assessed. Eighty ramp tests were performed in 44 patients (HeartMate II, Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA). Functional status was evaluated in 70% (31/44); average 6 minute walk test (6MWT) was 312 ± 220 min, New York Heart Association (NYHA) I-II/III-IV (70/30%) and activity scores very low-low/moderate-very high (55/45%). Decrease in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure per Δrpm was related to better NYHA classification; NYHA I-II vs. III-IV, -0.29 ± 0.15 vs. -0.09 ± 0.16 mm Hg/rpm ∗ 10 -2 (p = 0.007) as well as to activity score; very low-low vs. moderate-very high, -0.16 ± 0.16 vs. -0.31 ± 0.16 mm Hg/rpm ∗ 10 -2 (p = 0.02). Cardiac output change per Δrpm was correlated to measures of QOL. Ramp tests did not predict survival. In conclusion, hemodynamic changes during ramp studies are associated with measures of functional capacity and QOL. Hence, such tests could potentially identify patients in risk of failure to thrive during CF-LVAD support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-446
Number of pages5
JournalASAIO Journal
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Left ventricular assist devices
Architectural Accessibility
Heart-Assist Devices
Hemodynamics
Heart Failure
Quality of Life
Pumps
Capillarity
Failure to Thrive
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Survival
Cardiac Output
Industry

Keywords

  • functional capacity
  • heart failure
  • hemodynamics
  • left ventricular assist device
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ramp study hemodynamics, functional capacity, and outcome in heart failure patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices. / Jung, Mette H.; Gustafsson, Finn; Houston, Brian; Russell, Stuart D.

In: ASAIO Journal, Vol. 62, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 442-446.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jung, Mette H. ; Gustafsson, Finn ; Houston, Brian ; Russell, Stuart D. / Ramp study hemodynamics, functional capacity, and outcome in heart failure patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices. In: ASAIO Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 62, No. 4. pp. 442-446.
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