Ragweed antigen E and anti-IgE in human central versus peripheral isolated bronchi

James L. Ellis, Walter C. Hubbard, Sonya Meeker, Bradley J Undem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability of antigen to contract passively sensitized tissues was examined in human central (5 to 12 mm) and peripheral (0.5 to 2 mm) bronchi. Both central and peripheral bronchi contracted to ragweed antigen E (RW AgE), and these contractions were virtually abolished by a combination of indomethacin, cysteinyl-leukotriene, and histamine antagonists. There were, however, quantitative differences in contractile responses and in mediator release to RW AgE between central and peripheral bronchi. RW AgE was approximately 20-fold more potent in contracting peripheral bronchi compared with central bronchi. On a per weight of tissue basis, RW AgE released six- fold more histamine, 15- to 20-fold more immunoreactive leukotriene D4 (i- LTD4) and two- to 10-fold more prostanoids in the peripheral bronchi compared with central bronchi. Anti-IgE mimicked the effect of RW AgE with respect to inflammatory mediator release and with respect to the magnitude of the contractile response in peripheral and central bronchi. Anti-IgE, however, was more potent in contracting central than peripheral bronchi. Moreover, in peripheral bronchi, contractile responses to anti-IgE were only partially inhibited by a combination of indomethacin, cysteinyl-leukotriene, and histamine antagonists. These results indicate that the qualitative characteristics of antigen-induced mediator release and muscle contraction are similar in central versus peripheral bronchi. However, RW AgE is much more potent in causing smooth muscle constriction, and is capable of releasing a greater quantity of inflammatory mediators in peripheral bronchi/bronchioles than in the more central bronchi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-723
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume150
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1994

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Bronchi
Leukotriene Antagonists
Histamine Antagonists
Indomethacin
anti-IgE antibodies
Ambrosia artemisiifolia Amb a I protein
Leukotriene D4
Bronchioles
Antigens
Muscle Contraction
Constriction
Histamine
Prostaglandins
Smooth Muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Ragweed antigen E and anti-IgE in human central versus peripheral isolated bronchi. / Ellis, James L.; Hubbard, Walter C.; Meeker, Sonya; Undem, Bradley J.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 150, No. 3, 09.1994, p. 717-723.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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