Racial/ethnic disparities in report of physician-provided smoking cessation advice

Analysis of the 2000 National Health Interview Survey

Catalina Lopez-Quintero, Rosa M Crum, Yehuda D. Neumark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We explored racial/ethnic disparities in reports of smoking cessation advice among smokers who had visited a physician in the previous year. Also, we examined the likelihood of receipt of such advice across Hispanic subgroups and levels of English proficiency. Methods. We analyzed data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. Results. Nearly half of the 5652 respondents reported receiving smoking cessation advice from their doctor. Compared with Hispanics, and after control for a range of other factors, respondents in the non-Hispanic White (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.2, 2.0), non-Hispanic Black (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.0), and other non-Hispanic (adjusted OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.3, 3.6) groups were significantly more likely to report receiving advice. I English proficiency was not associated with receipt of physician advice among Hispanic smokers. Conclusions. Some 16 million smokers in the United States could not recall receiving advice to quit smoking from their physician in the preceding year. These missed opportunities, compounded by racial/ethnic disparities such as those observed between Hispanics and other groups and between Hispanic subgroups, suggest that considerably greater effort is needed to diminish the toll stemming from smoking and smoking-related diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2235-2239
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume96
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

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Smoking Cessation
Health Surveys
Hispanic Americans
Interviews
Physicians
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Racial/ethnic disparities in report of physician-provided smoking cessation advice : Analysis of the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. / Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Crum, Rosa M; Neumark, Yehuda D.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 96, No. 12, 12.2006, p. 2235-2239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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