Racial/ethnic differences in self-reported racism and Its association with cancer-related health behaviors

Salma Shariff-Marco, Ann C. Klassen, Janice Bowie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We used population-based survey data to estimate the prevalence of self-reported racism across racial/ethnic groups and to evaluate the association between self-reported racism and cancer-related health behaviors. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Questions measured self-reported racism in general and in health care. The cancer risk behaviors we assessed were smoking, binge drinking, not walking, being overweight or obese, and not being up to date with screenings for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Analyses included descriptive analyses and logistic regression. Results. Prevalences of self-reported racism varied between and within aggregate racial/ethnic groups. In adjusted analyses, general racism was associated with smoking, binge drinking, and being overweight or obese; health care racism was associated with not being up to date with screening for prostate cancer. Associations varied across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions. Associations between general racism and lifestyle behaviors suggest that racism is a potential stressor that may shape cancer-related health behaviors, and its impact may vary by race/ethnicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-374
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

Fingerprint

Racism
Health Behavior
Neoplasms
Ethnic Groups
Binge Drinking
Prostatic Neoplasms
Smoking
Delivery of Health Care
Risk-Taking
Health Surveys
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Walking
Life Style
Colorectal Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Racial/ethnic differences in self-reported racism and Its association with cancer-related health behaviors. / Shariff-Marco, Salma; Klassen, Ann C.; Bowie, Janice.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 2, 01.02.2010, p. 364-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f46c40d438ac4662820df62b4db73b01,
title = "Racial/ethnic differences in self-reported racism and Its association with cancer-related health behaviors",
abstract = "Objectives. We used population-based survey data to estimate the prevalence of self-reported racism across racial/ethnic groups and to evaluate the association between self-reported racism and cancer-related health behaviors. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Questions measured self-reported racism in general and in health care. The cancer risk behaviors we assessed were smoking, binge drinking, not walking, being overweight or obese, and not being up to date with screenings for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Analyses included descriptive analyses and logistic regression. Results. Prevalences of self-reported racism varied between and within aggregate racial/ethnic groups. In adjusted analyses, general racism was associated with smoking, binge drinking, and being overweight or obese; health care racism was associated with not being up to date with screening for prostate cancer. Associations varied across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions. Associations between general racism and lifestyle behaviors suggest that racism is a potential stressor that may shape cancer-related health behaviors, and its impact may vary by race/ethnicity.",
author = "Salma Shariff-Marco and Klassen, {Ann C.} and Janice Bowie",
year = "2010",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2009.163899",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "364--374",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Racial/ethnic differences in self-reported racism and Its association with cancer-related health behaviors

AU - Shariff-Marco, Salma

AU - Klassen, Ann C.

AU - Bowie, Janice

PY - 2010/2/1

Y1 - 2010/2/1

N2 - Objectives. We used population-based survey data to estimate the prevalence of self-reported racism across racial/ethnic groups and to evaluate the association between self-reported racism and cancer-related health behaviors. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Questions measured self-reported racism in general and in health care. The cancer risk behaviors we assessed were smoking, binge drinking, not walking, being overweight or obese, and not being up to date with screenings for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Analyses included descriptive analyses and logistic regression. Results. Prevalences of self-reported racism varied between and within aggregate racial/ethnic groups. In adjusted analyses, general racism was associated with smoking, binge drinking, and being overweight or obese; health care racism was associated with not being up to date with screening for prostate cancer. Associations varied across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions. Associations between general racism and lifestyle behaviors suggest that racism is a potential stressor that may shape cancer-related health behaviors, and its impact may vary by race/ethnicity.

AB - Objectives. We used population-based survey data to estimate the prevalence of self-reported racism across racial/ethnic groups and to evaluate the association between self-reported racism and cancer-related health behaviors. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Questions measured self-reported racism in general and in health care. The cancer risk behaviors we assessed were smoking, binge drinking, not walking, being overweight or obese, and not being up to date with screenings for breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancers. Analyses included descriptive analyses and logistic regression. Results. Prevalences of self-reported racism varied between and within aggregate racial/ethnic groups. In adjusted analyses, general racism was associated with smoking, binge drinking, and being overweight or obese; health care racism was associated with not being up to date with screening for prostate cancer. Associations varied across racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions. Associations between general racism and lifestyle behaviors suggest that racism is a potential stressor that may shape cancer-related health behaviors, and its impact may vary by race/ethnicity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=75649090466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=75649090466&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.2009.163899

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.2009.163899

M3 - Article

C2 - 20019302

AN - SCOPUS:75649090466

VL - 100

SP - 364

EP - 374

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 2

ER -