Racial/ethnic differences in experimental pain sensitivity and associated factors – Cardiovascular responsiveness and psychological status

Hee Jun Kim, Joel Daniel Greenspan, Richard Ohrbach, Roger B. Fillingim, William Maixner, Cynthia L. Renn, Meg Johantgen, Shijun Zhu, Susan G. Dorsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study evaluated the contributions of psychological status and cardiovascular responsiveness to racial/ethnic differences in experimental pain sensitivity. The baseline measures of 3,159 healthy individuals—non-Hispanic white (NHW): 1,637, African-American (AA): 1,012, Asian: 299, and Hispanic: 211—from the OPPERA prospective cohort study were used. Cardiovascular responsiveness measures and psychological status were included in structural equation modeling based mediation analyses. Pain catastrophizing was a significant mediator for the associations between race/ethnicity and heat pain tolerance, heat pain ratings, heat pain aftersensations, mechanical cutaneous pain ratings and aftersensations, and mechanical cutaneous pain temporal summation for both Asians and AAs compared to NHWs. HR/MAP index showed a significant inconsistent (mitigating) mediating effect on the association between race/ethnicity (AAs vs. NHWs) and heat pain tolerance. Similarly, coping inconsistently mediated the association between race/ethnicity and mechanical cutaneous pain temporal summation in both AAs and Asians, compared to NHWs. The factor encompassing depression, anxiety, and stress was a significant mediator for the associations between race/ethnicity (Asians vs. NHWs) and heat pain aftersensations. Thus, while pain catastrophizing mediated racial/ethnic differences in many of the QST measures, the psychological and cardiovascular mediators were distinctly restrictive, signifying multiple independent mechanisms in racial/ethnic differences in pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0215534
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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ethnic differences
pain
Psychology
Pain
nationalities and ethnic groups
Catastrophization
Hot Temperature
heat
Hispanic Americans
Skin
African Americans
anxiety
cohort studies
heat tolerance
Cohort Studies
Anxiety
Prospective Studies
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Racial/ethnic differences in experimental pain sensitivity and associated factors – Cardiovascular responsiveness and psychological status. / Kim, Hee Jun; Greenspan, Joel Daniel; Ohrbach, Richard; Fillingim, Roger B.; Maixner, William; Renn, Cynthia L.; Johantgen, Meg; Zhu, Shijun; Dorsey, Susan G.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 4, e0215534, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Hee Jun ; Greenspan, Joel Daniel ; Ohrbach, Richard ; Fillingim, Roger B. ; Maixner, William ; Renn, Cynthia L. ; Johantgen, Meg ; Zhu, Shijun ; Dorsey, Susan G. / Racial/ethnic differences in experimental pain sensitivity and associated factors – Cardiovascular responsiveness and psychological status. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 4.
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