Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services

C. C. Diala, C. Muntaner, C. Walrath, K. Nickerson, T. Laveist, Philip Leaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking mental health services. Methods. Data from the National Comorbidity Survey, which administered a structured diagnostic interview to a representative sample of the US population (N = 8098), were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression was used, and data were stratified by need for mental health services. Results. African Americans with depression were more likely than Whites with depresslon to "definitely go" (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8. P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)805-807
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume91
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001

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Mental Health Services
African Americans
Comorbidity
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Interviews
Depression
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Diala, C. C., Muntaner, C., Walrath, C., Nickerson, K., Laveist, T., & Leaf, P. (2001). Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services. American Journal of Public Health, 91(5), 805-807.

Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services. / Diala, C. C.; Muntaner, C.; Walrath, C.; Nickerson, K.; Laveist, T.; Leaf, Philip.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 91, No. 5, 2001, p. 805-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diala, CC, Muntaner, C, Walrath, C, Nickerson, K, Laveist, T & Leaf, P 2001, 'Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 91, no. 5, pp. 805-807.
Diala, C. C. ; Muntaner, C. ; Walrath, C. ; Nickerson, K. ; Laveist, T. ; Leaf, Philip. / Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2001 ; Vol. 91, No. 5. pp. 805-807.
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