Racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking professional mental health services

C. C. Diala, C. Muntaner, C. Walrath, K. Nickerson, T. Laveist, P. Leaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. This study examined racial/ethnic differences in attitudes toward seeking mental health services. Methods. Data from the National Comorbidity Survey, which administered a structured diagnostic interview to a representative sample of the US population (N = 8098), were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression was used, and data were stratified by need for mental health services. Results. African Americans with depression were more likely than Whites with depresslon to "definitely go" (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8. P<.001) seek mental health services. African Americans with severe psychiatric disorders were less likely to be "somewhat embarrassed if friends knew they sought care" (OR = 0.3. P<.001) than were their White counterparts. Conclusions. African Americans reported more positive attitudes toward seeking mental health services than did Whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)805-807
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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