Racial variation in umbilical cord blood sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor axis in African-American and white female neonates

Tanya Agurs-Collins, Sabine Rohrmann, Catherine Sutcliffe, Jessica L Bienstock, Deborah Monsegue, Folasade Akereyeni, Gary Bradwin, Nader Rifai, Michael N. Pollak, Elizabeth A Platz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate whether there is racial variation in venous umbilical cord blood concentrations of sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis between female African-American and white neonates. Methods: Maternal and birth characteristics and venous umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 77 African-American and 41 white full-term uncomplicated births at two urban hospitals in 2004 and 2005. Cord blood was measured for testosterone, dehydroespiandrosterone-sulfate, estradiol, and sex steroid hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) by immunoassay. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were measured by ELISA. Crude and multivariable-adjusted geometric mean concentrations were computed for the hormones. Results: African-American neonates weighed less at birth (3,228 g vs. 3,424 g, p <0.004) than whites. Birth weight was positively correlated with IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and the molar ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP-3, but inversely correlated with the molar ratio of IGF-2 to IGFBP-3. Adjusted models showed higher testosterone (1.82 ng/ml vs. 1.47 ng/ml, p = 0.006) and the molar ratio of testosterone to SHBG (0.42 vs. 0.30, p = 0.03) in African-American compared to white female neonates. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFBP-3 were lower in African-American compared to white female neonates, but only the difference for IGF-2 remained significant (496.5 ng/ml vs. 539.2 ng/ml, p = 0.04). Conclusion: We provide evidence of racial variation in cord blood testosterone and testosterone to SHBG in African- American compared to white female neonates, and higher IGF-2 in white compared to African-American female neonates. Findings suggest plausible explanations for a prenatal influence on subsequent breast cancer risk and mortality. Further work is needed to confirm these observations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-454
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Somatomedins
Fetal Blood
African Americans
Newborn Infant
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3
Testosterone
Globulins
Hormones
Steroids
Parturition
Term Birth
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Urban Hospitals
Immunoassay
Birth Weight
Estradiol
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Mothers
Breast Neoplasms

Keywords

  • African-American
  • IGF axis
  • Sex steroid hormones
  • Umbilical cord blood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Racial variation in umbilical cord blood sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor axis in African-American and white female neonates. / Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Rohrmann, Sabine; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Bienstock, Jessica L; Monsegue, Deborah; Akereyeni, Folasade; Bradwin, Gary; Rifai, Nader; Pollak, Michael N.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 23, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 445-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agurs-Collins, Tanya ; Rohrmann, Sabine ; Sutcliffe, Catherine ; Bienstock, Jessica L ; Monsegue, Deborah ; Akereyeni, Folasade ; Bradwin, Gary ; Rifai, Nader ; Pollak, Michael N. ; Platz, Elizabeth A. / Racial variation in umbilical cord blood sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor axis in African-American and white female neonates. In: Cancer Causes and Control. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 445-454.
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AU - Bienstock, Jessica L

AU - Monsegue, Deborah

AU - Akereyeni, Folasade

AU - Bradwin, Gary

AU - Rifai, Nader

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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate whether there is racial variation in venous umbilical cord blood concentrations of sex steroid hormones and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis between female African-American and white neonates. Methods: Maternal and birth characteristics and venous umbilical cord blood samples were collected from 77 African-American and 41 white full-term uncomplicated births at two urban hospitals in 2004 and 2005. Cord blood was measured for testosterone, dehydroespiandrosterone-sulfate, estradiol, and sex steroid hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) by immunoassay. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were measured by ELISA. Crude and multivariable-adjusted geometric mean concentrations were computed for the hormones. Results: African-American neonates weighed less at birth (3,228 g vs. 3,424 g, p <0.004) than whites. Birth weight was positively correlated with IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and the molar ratio of IGF-1 to IGFBP-3, but inversely correlated with the molar ratio of IGF-2 to IGFBP-3. Adjusted models showed higher testosterone (1.82 ng/ml vs. 1.47 ng/ml, p = 0.006) and the molar ratio of testosterone to SHBG (0.42 vs. 0.30, p = 0.03) in African-American compared to white female neonates. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFBP-3 were lower in African-American compared to white female neonates, but only the difference for IGF-2 remained significant (496.5 ng/ml vs. 539.2 ng/ml, p = 0.04). Conclusion: We provide evidence of racial variation in cord blood testosterone and testosterone to SHBG in African- American compared to white female neonates, and higher IGF-2 in white compared to African-American female neonates. Findings suggest plausible explanations for a prenatal influence on subsequent breast cancer risk and mortality. Further work is needed to confirm these observations.

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