Racial disparities in the management of acne: evidence from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005–2014

Andrew T. Rogers, Yevgeniy R. Semenov, Shawn Kwatra, Ginette A. Okoye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Racial health disparities are widespread in the United States, but little is known about racial disparities in the management of dermatological conditions. Materials and methods: Nationally representative data on the management of acne vulgaris were gathered from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) for the years 2005–2014. Visits to any specialist were included. Rao-Scott chi-square tests and multivariate adjusted logistic regressions were used to identify differences in patient demographics, visit characteristics and acne medications across races. Results: Black patients are less likely than white patients to visit a dermatologist (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.48, p = 0.001), receive any acne medication (aOR 0.64, p = 0.01), receive a combination acne medication (aOR 0.52, p = 0.007) or receive isotretinoin (aOR 0.46, p = 0.03). Adjusting for management by a dermatologist eliminated the association between race and the prescription of any acne medication as well as between race and the prescription of isotretinoin. Conclusion: Among outpatient visits for acne in the United States, racial disparities exist in the likelihood of seeing a dermatologist and receiving treatment. Treatment disparities are less common when care is provided by a dermatologist. More research is needed to better understand the causes of disparities in acne management and other dermatological conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Dermatological Treatment
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Sep 6 2017

Keywords

  • Acne vulgaris
  • disparities
  • isotretinoin
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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