Racial disparities in health care access and cardiovascular disease indicators in black and white older adults in the health ABC study

Ronica N. Rooks, Eleanor Marie Simonsick, Lisa M. Klesges, Anne B. Newman, Hilsa N. Ayonayon, Tamara B. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Black adults consistently exhibit higher rates of and poorer health outcomes due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other racial groups, independent of differences in socioeconomic status (SES). Whether factors related to health care access can further explain racial disparities in CVD has not been thoroughly examined. Method: Using logistic regression, the authors examined racial and health care (i.e., health insurance and access to care) associations with CVD indicators (i.e., hypertension, low ankle-arm index, and left ventricular hypertrophy) in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study, a longitudinal study of well-functioning older adults. Results: Older Black versus White adults had significantly worse health care. Overall, health care reduced the significant association between being Black and CVD only slightly, while race remained strongly associated with CVD after adjusting for demographics, SES, body mass index, and comorbidity. Discussion: Research on health care quality may contribute to our understanding of these disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)599-614
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Healthcare Disparities
Cardiovascular Diseases
health care
Disease
Health
health
Delivery of Health Care
Social Class
social status
Health Services Accessibility
Quality of Health Care
Health Services Research
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
comorbidity
hypertension
Health Insurance
Body Composition
health insurance
Ankle
Longitudinal Studies

Keywords

  • Access to care
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Health insurance
  • Racial disparities
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Racial disparities in health care access and cardiovascular disease indicators in black and white older adults in the health ABC study. / Rooks, Ronica N.; Simonsick, Eleanor Marie; Klesges, Lisa M.; Newman, Anne B.; Ayonayon, Hilsa N.; Harris, Tamara B.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 20, No. 6, 09.2008, p. 599-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rooks, Ronica N. ; Simonsick, Eleanor Marie ; Klesges, Lisa M. ; Newman, Anne B. ; Ayonayon, Hilsa N. ; Harris, Tamara B. / Racial disparities in health care access and cardiovascular disease indicators in black and white older adults in the health ABC study. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2008 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 599-614.
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