Racial disparities in diarrhea-associated hospitalizations among children in five US States, before and after introduction of rotavirus vaccine

Catherine Yen, Claudia A. Steiner, Marguerite Barrett, Aaron T. Curns, Katherine Hunter, Emily Wilson, Umesh D. Parashar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Racial differences in diarrheal disease have not been systematically examined, and the impact of rotavirus vaccine on these differences has not been assessed. We compared diarrhea-associated hospitalizations by race/ethnicity among children <5 years pre- (2000-2006) and post- (2007 and 2008) rotavirus vaccine introduction in five US states. Pre-vaccine hospitalization rates were greater among whites versus blacks and Hispanics. However, black (versus non-black) infants <6 months and white (versus non-white) children ≥1 year had higher rates. In 2008, racial disparities for children 12-35 months resolved, but higher hospitalization rates among black infants <6 months persisted, highlighting the need for timely vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7423-7426
Number of pages4
JournalVaccine
Volume28
Issue number46
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 28 2010

Keywords

  • Gastroenteritis
  • Health disparities
  • Rotavirus
  • Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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