Racial Differences in Choice and Control Among Older Adults: Results From Connecticut’s Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration

Chanee D. Fabius, Edna Brown, Julie T. Robison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined racial differences in determinants of choice and control in daily activities and service coordination for a sample of White and Black participants in the Connecticut Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration. Within-group analyses were conducted to understand factors that contribute to choice and control among participants. While no disparities were found in the odds of reporting choice and control, our findings show that White participants with mental health challenges, who lived with family, and had more functional impairments and Black participants with engagement transition challenges were less likely to have choice and control over daily activities. Determinants varied by race for choice in service coordination. Findings indicate a need for initiatives to target different factors for White and Black MFP participants to optimize opportunities for choice and control after returning to community living.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-187
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Social Policy
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2020

Keywords

  • Minority issues
  • autonomy and self-efficacy
  • decision making
  • long-term care
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Gerontology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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