Racial differences in antilipemic use and lipid control in high-risk older adults: Post-Medicare Part D

Joseph T. Hanlon, Robert M. Boudreau, Subashan Perera, Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Anne B. Newman, Eleanor M. Simonsick, Ronald I. Shorr, Douglas C. Bauer, Julie M. Donohue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Older blacks are less likely to receive guideline-recommended antilipemic therapy and achieve lipid control than older whites because, in part, of out-of-pocket costs. We sought to determine whether racial differences in antilipemic use and lipid control narrowed after Medicare Part D's implementation. Methods This before-after study included 1,091 black and white adults 70 years or older with coronary heart disease and/or diabetes mellitus from the Health Aging and Body Composition Study. Primary outcomes were antilipemic use and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control. Key independent variables were race, time (pre-Part D vs post-Part D), and their interaction. Results Before Part D, fewer blacks than whites reported taking an antilipemic (32.70% vs 49.35%), and this difference was sustained after Part D (blacks 48.30% vs whites 64.57%). Multivariable generalized estimating equations confirmed no post-Part D change in racial differences in antilipemic use (adjusted ratio of the odds ratio 1.07, 95% CI 0.79-1.45). Compared with whites, more blacks had poor lipid control both before Part D (24.30% vs 12.36%, respectively) and after Part D (24.46% vs 13.72%, respectively), with no post-Part D change in racial differences in lipid control (adjusted ratio of the odds ratio 0.82, 95% CI 0.51-1.33). Conclusion Although antilipemic use increased after Medicare Part D for both races, this policy change was associated with a change neither in lipid control for either racial group nor in the racial differences in antilipemic use or lipid control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)792-797
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican heart journal
Volume166
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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