Racial and socioeconomic disparities in access to primary care among people with chronic conditions

Leiyu Shi, Chien Chou Chen, Xiaoyu Nie, Jinsheng Zhu, Ruwei Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine racial and socioeconomic disparities in access to primary care among people with chronic conditions. Methods: Data for this study were taken from the household component of the 2010 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The analysis primarily focused on adults ≥18 years old. Logistic regressions were conducted among people with chronic conditions to compare primary care attributes between each minority group and their non-Hispanic white counterparts and between individuals with high, above average, or below average socioeconomic status and their low socioeconomic status counterparts, controlling for other individual factors. Results: Racial disparities were found in having usual source of care (USC), USC provider type, and USC location. However, no disparities were found in ease of contacting or getting to USC as well as the services received. Furthermore, very limited socioeconomic disparities were found after controlling for other individual characteristics, in particular race and insurance status. Conclusions: More efforts need to be devoted to racial/ethnic minorities with chronic conditions to improve their access to continuous and high-quality primary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-198
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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Primary Health Care
Social Class
Minority Groups
Insurance Coverage
Quality of Health Care
Health Expenditures
Logistic Models
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Access to health care
  • Chronic disease
  • Health care disparities
  • Primary health care
  • Quality of health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

Cite this

Racial and socioeconomic disparities in access to primary care among people with chronic conditions. / Shi, Leiyu; Chen, Chien Chou; Nie, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Jinsheng; Hu, Ruwei.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 27, No. 2, 03.2014, p. 189-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shi, Leiyu ; Chen, Chien Chou ; Nie, Xiaoyu ; Zhu, Jinsheng ; Hu, Ruwei. / Racial and socioeconomic disparities in access to primary care among people with chronic conditions. In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 189-198.
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