Racial and ethnic differences in mental healthcare utilization consistent with potentially effective care: The role of patient preferences

Anika L. Hines, Lisa A Cooper, Leiyu Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective Ethnic minorities are less likely than Whites to initiate and continue mental healthcare. Minorities also prefer non-medical approaches to address mental health issues. We evaluated sector-type as a modifier of the association of race/ethnicity with service utilization for mental health. We hypothesized that minorities utilize non-mental health sectors at rates consistent with guidelines and similar to Whites. Methods We examined data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiologic Studies (CPES) (n = 3803). We used logistic regression to assess the association of race/ethnicity with utilization consistent with potentially effective care across sectors—psychiatry, medical, non-medical mental health, human services, and spiritual. Results Asians [OR: 0.56 CI: 0.39, 0.82] and Blacks [OR: 0.74 CI: 0.60, 0.92] had lower odds of having ≥ 1 visit compared to Whites. Blacks also had lower odds of ≥ 4 [OR: 0.66 CI: 0.50, 0.87] and ≥ 12 visits [OR: 0.58 CI: 0.41, 0.83]. Sector-type modified these associations. Compared to Whites, Asians [OR: 0.49 CI: 0.30, 0.82] and Blacks [OR: 0.71 CI: 0.54, 0.94] had lower odds of ≥ 1 visit to the medical sector. Asians had lower odds of seeing psychiatrists for ≥ 8 visits [OR: 0.15 CI: 0.04, 0.54] and ≥ 12 visits [OR: 0.21 CI: 0.06, 0.77]. Asians and Blacks demonstrated similar utilization to Whites in non-medical mental health and spiritual settings. Conclusion Racial/ethnic differences in utilization consistent with treatment guidelines are ameliorated in sectors preferred by minorities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-19
Number of pages6
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume46
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Disparities
  • Patient-centered care
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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