Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Health among Asian Americans and Non-Hispanic Whites: Based on California Health Interview Survey

Hyunjeong Park, Eunsuk Choi, Young Su Park, Jennifer Wenzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While Asians are becoming the largest ethnic group in the United States, studies have focused on Asians as a single population. The purpose of this study was to explore the racial and ethnic mental health differences between non-Hispanic Whites and Asians, with an emphasis on understudied subgroups, from the California Health Interview Survey 2011/2012. In this dataset Asians had significantly lower adjusted odds ratios for both mental distress and serious mental illness. However, when Asians were divided into subgroups and compared to Whites, Vietnamese and Japanese subgroups were significantly lower than Whites for mental distress while Koreans were significantly higher. Vietnamese and Chinese were found to have significantly less serious mental illness than Whites in the subgroup analyses. Our results underscore the importance of recognizing that Asian subgroups should not be overlooked, and all Asians should not automatically be treated as a homogenous group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 22 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

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