Race, sex, drug use, and progression of human immunodeficiency virus disease

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Abstract

Background. The rates of progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and survival have been reported to differ among sociodemographic groups. It is unclear whether these differences reflect biologic differences or differences in access to medical care. Methods. We measured disease progression and survival in a cohort of 1372 patients seropositive for HIV who were treated at a single urban center (median follow-up, 1.6 years). We calculated the rates of survival for the entire cohort and the rates of progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death among the 740 patients who presented without AIDS. We used Cox proportional- hazards analysis to examine factors associated with progression to AIDS and death. Results. Progression to AIDS or death was associated with a CD4 cell count of 201 to 350 per cubic millimeter (relative risk, 2.0; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-756
Number of pages6
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume333
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 21 1995

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Virus Diseases
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Survival
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Disease Progression
Survival Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Race, sex, drug use, and progression of human immunodeficiency virus disease",
abstract = "Background. The rates of progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and survival have been reported to differ among sociodemographic groups. It is unclear whether these differences reflect biologic differences or differences in access to medical care. Methods. We measured disease progression and survival in a cohort of 1372 patients seropositive for HIV who were treated at a single urban center (median follow-up, 1.6 years). We calculated the rates of survival for the entire cohort and the rates of progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death among the 740 patients who presented without AIDS. We used Cox proportional- hazards analysis to examine factors associated with progression to AIDS and death. Results. Progression to AIDS or death was associated with a CD4 cell count of 201 to 350 per cubic millimeter (relative risk, 2.0; P",
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T1 - Race, sex, drug use, and progression of human immunodeficiency virus disease

AU - Chaisson, Richard E

AU - Keruly, Jeanne C

AU - Moore, Richard D

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N2 - Background. The rates of progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and survival have been reported to differ among sociodemographic groups. It is unclear whether these differences reflect biologic differences or differences in access to medical care. Methods. We measured disease progression and survival in a cohort of 1372 patients seropositive for HIV who were treated at a single urban center (median follow-up, 1.6 years). We calculated the rates of survival for the entire cohort and the rates of progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death among the 740 patients who presented without AIDS. We used Cox proportional- hazards analysis to examine factors associated with progression to AIDS and death. Results. Progression to AIDS or death was associated with a CD4 cell count of 201 to 350 per cubic millimeter (relative risk, 2.0; P

AB - Background. The rates of progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and survival have been reported to differ among sociodemographic groups. It is unclear whether these differences reflect biologic differences or differences in access to medical care. Methods. We measured disease progression and survival in a cohort of 1372 patients seropositive for HIV who were treated at a single urban center (median follow-up, 1.6 years). We calculated the rates of survival for the entire cohort and the rates of progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or death among the 740 patients who presented without AIDS. We used Cox proportional- hazards analysis to examine factors associated with progression to AIDS and death. Results. Progression to AIDS or death was associated with a CD4 cell count of 201 to 350 per cubic millimeter (relative risk, 2.0; P

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