Race, Offense Type, and Suicide Ideation: Tests of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory in Juvenile Offenders

Ian Cero, Kelly L. Zuromski, Tracy K. Witte, Rebecca Fix, Barry Burkhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study evaluated the synergy hypothesis of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS), which argues thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are positively interactive in their association with suicide ideation, in a group of juvenile offenders. It also examined whether this prediction is differentially applicable across race/ethnicity or offense type. Participants included 590 adjudicated and confined male juveniles. Regression was used to test the association between suicide ideation and thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and their interaction term. Subsequent analyses included tests of group interactions related to race/ethnicity and offense type. No interaction between thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness was observed, despite adequate power. No significant group interactions were observed for race/ethnicity or offense type. However, results did show significant linear relationships between thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and ideation, highlighting their potential utility as intervention targets in this at-risk population. Thus, although the current results are the first to show the basic IPTS risk factors generalize across race/ethnicity and offense type, they also failed to support that those factors were interactive, a primary IPTS claim. The absence of an interaction between thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness suggests their role in suicide ideation for juvenile offenders may be more parsimonious than the IPTS proposes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-558
Number of pages15
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Psychological Theory
Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Race, Offense Type, and Suicide Ideation : Tests of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory in Juvenile Offenders. / Cero, Ian; Zuromski, Kelly L.; Witte, Tracy K.; Fix, Rebecca; Burkhart, Barry.

In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, Vol. 48, No. 5, 01.10.2018, p. 544-558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cero, Ian ; Zuromski, Kelly L. ; Witte, Tracy K. ; Fix, Rebecca ; Burkhart, Barry. / Race, Offense Type, and Suicide Ideation : Tests of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory in Juvenile Offenders. In: Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 544-558.
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