Race matters: A systematic review of racial/ethnic disparity in Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology reported outcomes

Melissa F. Wellons, Victor Y. Fujimoto, Valerie L. Baker, Debbie S. Barrington, Diana Broomfield, William H. Catherino, Gloria Richard-Davis, Mary Ryan, Kim Thornton, Alicia Y. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To systematically review the reporting of race/ethnicity in Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) Clinic Outcome Reporting System (CORS) publications. Design: Systematic review using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology of literature published in PubMed on race/ethnicity that includes data from SART CORS. Setting: Not applicable. Patient(s): Not applicable. Intervention(s): In vitro fertilization cycles reported to SART. Main Outcome Measure(s): Any outcomes reported in SART CORS. Result(s): Seven publications were identified that assessed racial/ethnic disparities in IVF outcomes using SART data. All reported a racial/ethnic disparity. However, more than 35% of cycles were excluded from analysis because of missing race/ethnicity data. Conclusion(s): Review of current publications of SART data suggests significant racial/ethnic disparities in IVF outcomes. However, the potential for selection bias limits confidence in these findings, given that fewer than 65% of SART reported cycles include race/ethnicity. Our understanding of how race/ethnicity influences ART outcome could be greatly improved if information on race/ethnicity was available for all reported cycles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-409
Number of pages4
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume98
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • IVF
  • Race
  • SART
  • disparity
  • ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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