Quitting among non-treatment-seeking marijuana users: Reasons and changes in other substance use

Marc Copersino, Susan Boyd, Donald Tashkin, Marilyn Huestis, Stephen Heishman, John Dermand, Michael Simmons, David Gorelick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the self-reported reasons for quitting marijuana use, changes in other substance use during the quit attempt, and reasons for the resumption of use in 104 non-treatment-seeking adult marijuana smokers. Reasons for quitting were shown to be primarily motivated by concerns about the negative impact of marijuana on health and on self- and social image. The spontaneous quitting of marijuana use is often associated with an increase in the use of legal substances such as alcohol, tobacco, and sleeping aids, but not with the initiation of new substance use. These findings suggest areas for further research on spontaneous recovery from marijuana use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-302
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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  • Cite this

    Copersino, M., Boyd, S., Tashkin, D., Huestis, M., Heishman, S., Dermand, J., Simmons, M., & Gorelick, D. (2006). Quitting among non-treatment-seeking marijuana users: Reasons and changes in other substance use. American Journal on Addictions, 15(4), 297-302. https://doi.org/10.1080/10550490600754341