Quantitative pharmacologic MRI: Mapping the cerebral blood volume response to cocaine in dopamine transporter knockout mice

Teodora Adriana Perles-Barbacaru, Daniel Procissi, Andrey V. Demyanenko, F. Scott Hall, George R. Uhl, Russell E. Jacobs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The use of pharmacologic MRI (phMRI) in mouse models of brain disorders allows noninvasive in vivo assessment of drug-modulated local cerebral blood volume changes (δCBV) as one correlate of neuronal and neurovascular activities. In this report, we employed CBV-weighted phMRI to compare cocaine-modulated neuronal activity in dopamine transporter (DAT) knockout (KO) and wild-type mice. Cocaine acts to block the dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT) that clear their respective neurotransmitters from the synapses, helping to terminate cognate neurotransmission. Cocaine consistently reduced CBV, with a similar pattern of regional δCBV in brain structures involved in mediating reward in both DAT genotypes. The largest effects (- 20% to - 30% δCBV) were seen in the nucleus accumbens and several cortical regions. Decreasing response amplitudes to cocaine were noted in more posterior components of the cortico-mesolimbic circuit. DAT KO mice had significantly attenuated δCBV amplitudes, shortened times to peak response, and reduced response duration in most regions. This study demonstrates that DAT knockout does not abolish the phMRI responses to cocaine, suggesting that adaptations to loss of DAT and/or retained cocaine activity in other monoamine neurotransmitter systems underlie these responses in DAT KO mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-628
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroImage
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Cocaine
Knockout Mice
Neurotransmitter Agents
Norepinephrine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Cerebral Blood Volume
Nucleus Accumbens
Brain Diseases
Reward
Synaptic Transmission
Synapses
Genotype
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Perles-Barbacaru, T. A., Procissi, D., Demyanenko, A. V., Hall, F. S., Uhl, G. R., & Jacobs, R. E. (2011). Quantitative pharmacologic MRI: Mapping the cerebral blood volume response to cocaine in dopamine transporter knockout mice. NeuroImage, 55(2), 622-628. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.12.048

Quantitative pharmacologic MRI : Mapping the cerebral blood volume response to cocaine in dopamine transporter knockout mice. / Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora Adriana; Procissi, Daniel; Demyanenko, Andrey V.; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Jacobs, Russell E.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 55, No. 2, 15.03.2011, p. 622-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perles-Barbacaru, TA, Procissi, D, Demyanenko, AV, Hall, FS, Uhl, GR & Jacobs, RE 2011, 'Quantitative pharmacologic MRI: Mapping the cerebral blood volume response to cocaine in dopamine transporter knockout mice', NeuroImage, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 622-628. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.12.048
Perles-Barbacaru, Teodora Adriana ; Procissi, Daniel ; Demyanenko, Andrey V. ; Hall, F. Scott ; Uhl, George R. ; Jacobs, Russell E. / Quantitative pharmacologic MRI : Mapping the cerebral blood volume response to cocaine in dopamine transporter knockout mice. In: NeuroImage. 2011 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 622-628.
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