Quality of life of community-residing persons with dementia based on self-rated and caregiver-rated measures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To identify correlates of self-rated and caregiver-rated quality of life (QOL) in community-residing persons with dementia (PWD) for intervention development. Methods: Cross-sectional data of 254 PWD and their caregivers participating in a clinical trial were derived from in-home assessments. Self-rated QOL was measured with the Quality of Life-Alzheimer Disease (QOL-AD) scale, and caregiver-rated QOL was measured using the QOL-AD and Alzheimer Disease-Related Quality of Life (ADRQL) scales. Multivariate modeling identified correlates of the PWD' QOL. Results: Self-rated QOL was related significantly to participant race, unmet needs, depression, and total medications. Caregiver-rated QOL-AD scores were significantly associated with participant function, unmet needs, depression, and health problems and with caregiver burden and self-rated health. Significant correlates of ADRQL scores included neuropsychiatric symptom severity, functional and cognitive impairment, and caregiver burden and depression. Conclusions: Correlates of QOL in community-residing PWD depend on who rates the PWD's QOL and which measure is used. Addressing health problems, medication use, and dementia-related unmet needs, reducing functional dependency, and treating neuropsychiatric symptoms in PWD, while reducing caregiver burden and depression, may maximize QOL in those with dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1379-1389
Number of pages11
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume21
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

Keywords

  • Caregivers
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Dementia
  • Health services needs and demands
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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