Quality of Life, Depression, and Anxiety in Ventricular Assist Device Therapy: Longitudinal Outcomes for Patients and Family Caregivers

Julie T. Bidwell, Karen S. Lyons, James O. Mudd, Jill M. Gelow, Christopher V. Chien, Shirin O. Hiatt, Kathleen L. Grady, Christopher S. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Patients who receive ventricular assist device (VAD) therapy typically rely on informal caregivers (family members or friends) to assist them in managing their device. OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of this study is to characterize changes in person-oriented outcomes (quality of life [QOL], depression, and anxiety) for VAD patients and their caregivers together from pre-implantation to 3 months post-implantation. METHODS:: This was a formal interim analysis from an ongoing prospective study of VAD patients and caregivers (n = 41 dyads). Data on person-oriented outcomes (QOL: EuroQol 5 Dimensions Visual Analog Scale; depression: Patient Health Questionnaire-8; anxiety: Brief Symptom Inventory) were collected at 3 time points (just prior to implantation and at 1 and 3 months post-implantation). Trajectories of change for patients and caregivers on each measure were estimated using latent growth modeling with parallel processes. RESULTS:: Patients’ QOL improved significantly over time, whereas caregiver QOL worsened. Depression and anxiety also improved significantly among patients but did not change among caregivers. There was substantial variability in change on all outcomes for both patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS:: This is the first quantitative study of VAD patient-caregiver dyads in modern devices that describes change in person-oriented outcomes from pre-implantation to post-implantation. This work supports the need for future studies that account for the inherent relationships between patient and caregiver outcomes and examine variability in patient and caregiver responses to VAD therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 2 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Heart-Assist Devices
Caregivers
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Depression
Therapeutics
Equipment and Supplies
Visual Analog Scale
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Quality of Life, Depression, and Anxiety in Ventricular Assist Device Therapy : Longitudinal Outcomes for Patients and Family Caregivers. / Bidwell, Julie T.; Lyons, Karen S.; Mudd, James O.; Gelow, Jill M.; Chien, Christopher V.; Hiatt, Shirin O.; Grady, Kathleen L.; Lee, Christopher S.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 02.11.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bidwell, Julie T. ; Lyons, Karen S. ; Mudd, James O. ; Gelow, Jill M. ; Chien, Christopher V. ; Hiatt, Shirin O. ; Grady, Kathleen L. ; Lee, Christopher S. / Quality of Life, Depression, and Anxiety in Ventricular Assist Device Therapy : Longitudinal Outcomes for Patients and Family Caregivers. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2016.
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