Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis

Taylor A. Sohn, Kurtis A. Campbell, Henry A. Pitt, Patricia K. Sauter, Joann Coleman, Keith D. Lillemoe, Charles J. Yeo, John L Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term and long-term outcome as well as quality of life in patients undergoing surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Between January 1980 and December 1996, a total of 255 patients underwent surgery for chronic pancreatitis at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. The etiology of the disease, indications for surgery, patient characteristics and long-term survival were analyzed. A visual analog quality-of-life questionnaire containing 23 items graded on a scale of 0 to 10 (0 = worst and 10 = best) was sent to patients postoperatively. Visual analog responses relating to before and after the chronic pancreatitis surgery were compared using a paired t test. During the 17-year review period, 263 operations were performed for chronic pancreatitis in 255 patients. The most common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (88%), weight loss (36%), nausea/vomiting (30%), jaundice (14%), and diarrhea (12%). The cause of the pancreatitis was presumed to be alcohol in 43%, idiopathic in 38%, pancreas divisum in 5%, ampullary abnormality in 4%, and gallstones in 3%. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was the most common procedure in 96 patients (37%), followed by distal pancreatectomy in 67 (25%), Puestow procedure in 52 (19%), sphincteroplasty in 37 (14%), and Duval procedure in five (2%). The overall mortality and morbidity rates were 1.9% and 35%, respectively. Two hundred twenty-seven (89%) of the 255 patients were alive at last follow-up. For the entire cohort of patients, the 5- and 10-year actuarial survivals were 88% and 82%, respectively. One hundred six (47%) of the 227 living patients responded to the visual analog quality-of-life questionnaire. Patients reported improvements in all aspects of the quality-of-life survey including enjoyment out of life, satisfaction with life, pain, number of hospitalizations, feelings of usefulness, and overall health (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-365
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 2000

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Chronic Pancreatitis
Quality of Life
Survival
Pancreatectomy
Pancreaticoduodenectomy
Gallstones
Jaundice
Pancreatitis
Nausea
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting
Weight Loss
Pancreas
Diarrhea
Emotions
Hospitalization
Alcohols
Morbidity
Pain
Mortality

Keywords

  • Pancreatitis
  • Quality of life
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Sohn, T. A., Campbell, K. A., Pitt, H. A., Sauter, P. K., Coleman, J., Lillemoe, K. D., ... Cameron, J. L. (2000). Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 4(4), 355-365.

Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis. / Sohn, Taylor A.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Pitt, Henry A.; Sauter, Patricia K.; Coleman, Joann; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Yeo, Charles J.; Cameron, John L.

In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 4, No. 4, 07.2000, p. 355-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sohn, TA, Campbell, KA, Pitt, HA, Sauter, PK, Coleman, J, Lillemoe, KD, Yeo, CJ & Cameron, JL 2000, 'Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis', Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 355-365.
Sohn TA, Campbell KA, Pitt HA, Sauter PK, Coleman J, Lillemoe KD et al. Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis. Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2000 Jul;4(4):355-365.
Sohn, Taylor A. ; Campbell, Kurtis A. ; Pitt, Henry A. ; Sauter, Patricia K. ; Coleman, Joann ; Lillemoe, Keith D. ; Yeo, Charles J. ; Cameron, John L. / Quality of Life and Long-Term Survival after Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2000 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 355-365.
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