Quality Improvement Process in a Sickle Cell Infusion Center

Lauren N. Whiteman, Sophie Lanzkron, Rosalyn Stewart, Carlton Haywood, John Strouse, Leonard Feldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The American Pain Society recommends that individuals experiencing sickle cell crisis receive parenteral pain medication within 30 minutes of assessment. We examined factors affecting achievement of this standard at the Johns Hopkins Sickle Cell Infusion Center. Methods: Baseline patient care time intervals and data on variables affecting the ability to achieve the American Pain Society goal were measured. Time to first parenteral opiate administration was modeled using simple and multivariable linear regression. Results: Mean time from initial assessment to first dose was initially 41 minutes. Increased nurse to patient ratio decreased time to first dose. Conclusions: Of the factors associated with improved times to first dose, only nurse to patient ratio is amenable to process change, suggesting it as a potential target for future interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-544
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume128
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Quality Improvement
Opiate Alkaloids
Nurses
Aptitude
Linear Models
Patient Care
Pain

Keywords

  • Acute care
  • Quality improvement
  • Sickle cell disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Quality Improvement Process in a Sickle Cell Infusion Center. / Whiteman, Lauren N.; Lanzkron, Sophie; Stewart, Rosalyn; Haywood, Carlton; Strouse, John; Feldman, Leonard.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 128, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 541-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5a8ac0d0f75a48ffba2c5140849e34bf,
title = "Quality Improvement Process in a Sickle Cell Infusion Center",
abstract = "Background: The American Pain Society recommends that individuals experiencing sickle cell crisis receive parenteral pain medication within 30 minutes of assessment. We examined factors affecting achievement of this standard at the Johns Hopkins Sickle Cell Infusion Center. Methods: Baseline patient care time intervals and data on variables affecting the ability to achieve the American Pain Society goal were measured. Time to first parenteral opiate administration was modeled using simple and multivariable linear regression. Results: Mean time from initial assessment to first dose was initially 41 minutes. Increased nurse to patient ratio decreased time to first dose. Conclusions: Of the factors associated with improved times to first dose, only nurse to patient ratio is amenable to process change, suggesting it as a potential target for future interventions.",
keywords = "Acute care, Quality improvement, Sickle cell disease",
author = "Whiteman, {Lauren N.} and Sophie Lanzkron and Rosalyn Stewart and Carlton Haywood and John Strouse and Leonard Feldman",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.11.020",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "128",
pages = "541--544",
journal = "American Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0002-9343",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quality Improvement Process in a Sickle Cell Infusion Center

AU - Whiteman, Lauren N.

AU - Lanzkron, Sophie

AU - Stewart, Rosalyn

AU - Haywood, Carlton

AU - Strouse, John

AU - Feldman, Leonard

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - Background: The American Pain Society recommends that individuals experiencing sickle cell crisis receive parenteral pain medication within 30 minutes of assessment. We examined factors affecting achievement of this standard at the Johns Hopkins Sickle Cell Infusion Center. Methods: Baseline patient care time intervals and data on variables affecting the ability to achieve the American Pain Society goal were measured. Time to first parenteral opiate administration was modeled using simple and multivariable linear regression. Results: Mean time from initial assessment to first dose was initially 41 minutes. Increased nurse to patient ratio decreased time to first dose. Conclusions: Of the factors associated with improved times to first dose, only nurse to patient ratio is amenable to process change, suggesting it as a potential target for future interventions.

AB - Background: The American Pain Society recommends that individuals experiencing sickle cell crisis receive parenteral pain medication within 30 minutes of assessment. We examined factors affecting achievement of this standard at the Johns Hopkins Sickle Cell Infusion Center. Methods: Baseline patient care time intervals and data on variables affecting the ability to achieve the American Pain Society goal were measured. Time to first parenteral opiate administration was modeled using simple and multivariable linear regression. Results: Mean time from initial assessment to first dose was initially 41 minutes. Increased nurse to patient ratio decreased time to first dose. Conclusions: Of the factors associated with improved times to first dose, only nurse to patient ratio is amenable to process change, suggesting it as a potential target for future interventions.

KW - Acute care

KW - Quality improvement

KW - Sickle cell disease

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929046939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929046939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.11.020

DO - 10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.11.020

M3 - Article

VL - 128

SP - 541

EP - 544

JO - American Journal of Medicine

JF - American Journal of Medicine

SN - 0002-9343

IS - 5

ER -