Qualitative amniotic fluid volume versus amniocentesis in predicting infection in preterm premature rupture of the membranes

Anthony M. Vintzileos, Winston A. Campbell, David J. Nochimson, Paul J. Weinbaum, Danilo T. Escoto, Mark H. Mirochnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Qualitative amniotic fluid volume assessment and amniocentesis were performed on admission in 54 patients who presented with premature rupture of the membranes and no clinical signs of infection or labor. Comparison of these two methods in predicting infection outcome-as reflected by the development of clinical amnionitis andOor neonatal sepsis -suggests them to have the same efficacy in predicting infection outcome in patients with premature rupture of the membranes. Qualitative amniotic fluid volume was found to have sensitivity 50%, specificity 92.8%, positive predictive value 66.6%, and negative predictive value 86.6%; amniocentesis was found to have sensitivity 58.3%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 58.3%, and negative predictive value 88%. The use of ultrasonically estimated amniotic fluid volume could replace or be used in addition to amniocentesis in identifying patients with ruptured membranes at particular risk for developing infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)579-583
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume67
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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