Pulmonary metastases in guinea pigs as a consequence of dermal implantation of line-10 tumor cells

James T. Hunter, M. P. Ashley, H. J. Rapp, S. Sukumar, B. Zbar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Metastases to the lungs of guinea pigs occurred at high frequency as a consequence of intradermal implantation of tumor cells derived from the syngeneic hepatocellular carcinoma line-10. Surgery had a major influence on the proportion of guinea pigs found to have pulmonary metastases at necropsy. Without surgery all guinea pigs died with extensive lymph node metastases; macroscopic pulmonary metastases were present in a minority of the animals. Animals treated by excision of dermal tumors survived longer than untreated animals, and macroscopic pulmonary metastases were present in the majority of the animals. Animals treated by excision of dermal tumor and regional lymph nodes were rendered tumor-free. The data suggest that lymph node metastases were the most likely source of the tumor cells that spread to the lungs in animals from whom the dermal tumor transplant had been removed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Immunology Immunotherapy
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1981

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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