Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters

Nathaniel Rothman, D. Patrick Ford, Michael E. Baser, John A. Hansen, Tara O'Toole, Melvyn S. Tockman, Paul Timothy Strickland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied cross-seasonal changes in pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in 52 wildland firefighters in Northern California. The mean cross-seasonal change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was –1.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] –0.5%, –2.0%) with a corresponding mean change in forced expiratory volume (FVC) of –0.3% (95% CI 0A%, -1.0%). Decreases in FEVt and FVC were most strongly associated with hours of recent fire-fighting activity (P =.002 and.01, respectively). When the study group was divided into three categories based on recent fire-fighting activity, firefighters in the high activity category (mean ± SE, 73 ± 7 hours of fire-fighting in previous week) had a -2.9% (130 mL) change in FEV1 and a -1.9% (102 mL) change in forced vital capacity (FVC). There was a significant cross-seasonal increase in most respiratory symptoms evaluated. Several symptoms (eye irritation, nose irritation, and wheezing) were associated with recent fire-fighting. These findings suggest that wildland firefighters experience a small oross-seasonal decline in pulmonary function and an increase in several respiratory symptoms. Research is under way to identify the fire conditions and specific components of exposure that produce pulmonary irritants, and to examine the potential reversibility of acute pulmonary change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1163-1167
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Occupational Medicine
Volume33
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Firefighters
Forced Expiratory Volume
Vital Capacity
Lung
Confidence Intervals
Irritants
Respiratory Sounds
Nose
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rothman, N., Ford, D. P., Baser, M. E., Hansen, J. A., O'Toole, T., Tockman, M. S., & Strickland, P. T. (1991). Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters. Journal of Occupational Medicine, 33(11), 1163-1167.

Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters. / Rothman, Nathaniel; Ford, D. Patrick; Baser, Michael E.; Hansen, John A.; O'Toole, Tara; Tockman, Melvyn S.; Strickland, Paul Timothy.

In: Journal of Occupational Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 11, 1991, p. 1163-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rothman, N, Ford, DP, Baser, ME, Hansen, JA, O'Toole, T, Tockman, MS & Strickland, PT 1991, 'Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters', Journal of Occupational Medicine, vol. 33, no. 11, pp. 1163-1167.
Rothman N, Ford DP, Baser ME, Hansen JA, O'Toole T, Tockman MS et al. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters. Journal of Occupational Medicine. 1991;33(11):1163-1167.
Rothman, Nathaniel ; Ford, D. Patrick ; Baser, Michael E. ; Hansen, John A. ; O'Toole, Tara ; Tockman, Melvyn S. ; Strickland, Paul Timothy. / Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters. In: Journal of Occupational Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 33, No. 11. pp. 1163-1167.
@article{206b367f4eca45de95511ab2341355dd,
title = "Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters",
abstract = "We studied cross-seasonal changes in pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in 52 wildland firefighters in Northern California. The mean cross-seasonal change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was –1.2{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] –0.5{\%}, –2.0{\%}) with a corresponding mean change in forced expiratory volume (FVC) of –0.3{\%} (95{\%} CI 0A{\%}, -1.0{\%}). Decreases in FEVt and FVC were most strongly associated with hours of recent fire-fighting activity (P =.002 and.01, respectively). When the study group was divided into three categories based on recent fire-fighting activity, firefighters in the high activity category (mean ± SE, 73 ± 7 hours of fire-fighting in previous week) had a -2.9{\%} (130 mL) change in FEV1 and a -1.9{\%} (102 mL) change in forced vital capacity (FVC). There was a significant cross-seasonal increase in most respiratory symptoms evaluated. Several symptoms (eye irritation, nose irritation, and wheezing) were associated with recent fire-fighting. These findings suggest that wildland firefighters experience a small oross-seasonal decline in pulmonary function and an increase in several respiratory symptoms. Research is under way to identify the fire conditions and specific components of exposure that produce pulmonary irritants, and to examine the potential reversibility of acute pulmonary change.",
author = "Nathaniel Rothman and Ford, {D. Patrick} and Baser, {Michael E.} and Hansen, {John A.} and Tara O'Toole and Tockman, {Melvyn S.} and Strickland, {Paul Timothy}",
year = "1991",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "1163--1167",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in wildland firefighters

AU - Rothman, Nathaniel

AU - Ford, D. Patrick

AU - Baser, Michael E.

AU - Hansen, John A.

AU - O'Toole, Tara

AU - Tockman, Melvyn S.

AU - Strickland, Paul Timothy

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - We studied cross-seasonal changes in pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in 52 wildland firefighters in Northern California. The mean cross-seasonal change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was –1.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] –0.5%, –2.0%) with a corresponding mean change in forced expiratory volume (FVC) of –0.3% (95% CI 0A%, -1.0%). Decreases in FEVt and FVC were most strongly associated with hours of recent fire-fighting activity (P =.002 and.01, respectively). When the study group was divided into three categories based on recent fire-fighting activity, firefighters in the high activity category (mean ± SE, 73 ± 7 hours of fire-fighting in previous week) had a -2.9% (130 mL) change in FEV1 and a -1.9% (102 mL) change in forced vital capacity (FVC). There was a significant cross-seasonal increase in most respiratory symptoms evaluated. Several symptoms (eye irritation, nose irritation, and wheezing) were associated with recent fire-fighting. These findings suggest that wildland firefighters experience a small oross-seasonal decline in pulmonary function and an increase in several respiratory symptoms. Research is under way to identify the fire conditions and specific components of exposure that produce pulmonary irritants, and to examine the potential reversibility of acute pulmonary change.

AB - We studied cross-seasonal changes in pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in 52 wildland firefighters in Northern California. The mean cross-seasonal change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was –1.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] –0.5%, –2.0%) with a corresponding mean change in forced expiratory volume (FVC) of –0.3% (95% CI 0A%, -1.0%). Decreases in FEVt and FVC were most strongly associated with hours of recent fire-fighting activity (P =.002 and.01, respectively). When the study group was divided into three categories based on recent fire-fighting activity, firefighters in the high activity category (mean ± SE, 73 ± 7 hours of fire-fighting in previous week) had a -2.9% (130 mL) change in FEV1 and a -1.9% (102 mL) change in forced vital capacity (FVC). There was a significant cross-seasonal increase in most respiratory symptoms evaluated. Several symptoms (eye irritation, nose irritation, and wheezing) were associated with recent fire-fighting. These findings suggest that wildland firefighters experience a small oross-seasonal decline in pulmonary function and an increase in several respiratory symptoms. Research is under way to identify the fire conditions and specific components of exposure that produce pulmonary irritants, and to examine the potential reversibility of acute pulmonary change.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025719421&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025719421&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1765858

AN - SCOPUS:0025719421

VL - 33

SP - 1163

EP - 1167

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 11

ER -