Public expectations for nonemergency hospital resources and services during disasters

Rachel L. Charney, Terri Rebmann, Cybill Esguerra, Charlene W. Lai, Preeti Dalawari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The public's expectations of hospital services during disasters may not reflect current hospital disaster plans. The objective of this study was to determine the public's expected hospital service utilization during a pandemic, earthquake, and terrorist bombing.

METHODS: A survey was distributed to adult patients or family members at 3 emergency departments (EDs). Participants identified resources and services they expect to need during 3 disaster scenarios. Linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher expected utilization scores for each scenario.

RESULTS: Of the 961 people who participated in the study, 66.9% were women, 47.5% were white, and 44.6% were black. Determinants of higher pandemic resource utilization included persons who were younger (P < .01); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED visits (P < .01), hospitalization (P = .001), or fewer primary care provider visits (P = .001) in the past year; and did not have a reunification plan (P < .001). Determinants of higher earthquake resource utilization included persons who were non-white (P < .001); who were a patient or spouse (vs parent) participating in the study (P < .05 and P = .001); and had higher ED visits in the past year (P = .001). Determinants of higher bombing resource utilization included persons who were female (P = .001); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED (P = .001) or primary care provider (P < .01) visits in past year; and experienced the loss of home or property during a past disaster (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS: Public expectations of hospitals during disasters are high, and some expectations are inappropriate. Better community disaster planning and public risk communication are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-174
Number of pages8
JournalDisaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Disasters
Hospital Emergency Service
Public Hospitals
Earthquakes
Pandemics
Primary Health Care
Disaster Planning
Spouses
Linear Models
Hospitalization
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Public expectations for nonemergency hospital resources and services during disasters. / Charney, Rachel L.; Rebmann, Terri; Esguerra, Cybill; Lai, Charlene W.; Dalawari, Preeti.

In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 167-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charney, Rachel L. ; Rebmann, Terri ; Esguerra, Cybill ; Lai, Charlene W. ; Dalawari, Preeti. / Public expectations for nonemergency hospital resources and services during disasters. In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 167-174.
@article{c91745336440416d8df60ac5079289e2,
title = "Public expectations for nonemergency hospital resources and services during disasters",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The public's expectations of hospital services during disasters may not reflect current hospital disaster plans. The objective of this study was to determine the public's expected hospital service utilization during a pandemic, earthquake, and terrorist bombing.METHODS: A survey was distributed to adult patients or family members at 3 emergency departments (EDs). Participants identified resources and services they expect to need during 3 disaster scenarios. Linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher expected utilization scores for each scenario.RESULTS: Of the 961 people who participated in the study, 66.9{\%} were women, 47.5{\%} were white, and 44.6{\%} were black. Determinants of higher pandemic resource utilization included persons who were younger (P < .01); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED visits (P < .01), hospitalization (P = .001), or fewer primary care provider visits (P = .001) in the past year; and did not have a reunification plan (P < .001). Determinants of higher earthquake resource utilization included persons who were non-white (P < .001); who were a patient or spouse (vs parent) participating in the study (P < .05 and P = .001); and had higher ED visits in the past year (P = .001). Determinants of higher bombing resource utilization included persons who were female (P = .001); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED (P = .001) or primary care provider (P < .01) visits in past year; and experienced the loss of home or property during a past disaster (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS: Public expectations of hospitals during disasters are high, and some expectations are inappropriate. Better community disaster planning and public risk communication are needed.",
author = "Charney, {Rachel L.} and Terri Rebmann and Cybill Esguerra and Lai, {Charlene W.} and Preeti Dalawari",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/dmp.2013.4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "167--174",
journal = "Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness",
issn = "1935-7893",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Public expectations for nonemergency hospital resources and services during disasters

AU - Charney, Rachel L.

AU - Rebmann, Terri

AU - Esguerra, Cybill

AU - Lai, Charlene W.

AU - Dalawari, Preeti

PY - 2013/4/1

Y1 - 2013/4/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The public's expectations of hospital services during disasters may not reflect current hospital disaster plans. The objective of this study was to determine the public's expected hospital service utilization during a pandemic, earthquake, and terrorist bombing.METHODS: A survey was distributed to adult patients or family members at 3 emergency departments (EDs). Participants identified resources and services they expect to need during 3 disaster scenarios. Linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher expected utilization scores for each scenario.RESULTS: Of the 961 people who participated in the study, 66.9% were women, 47.5% were white, and 44.6% were black. Determinants of higher pandemic resource utilization included persons who were younger (P < .01); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED visits (P < .01), hospitalization (P = .001), or fewer primary care provider visits (P = .001) in the past year; and did not have a reunification plan (P < .001). Determinants of higher earthquake resource utilization included persons who were non-white (P < .001); who were a patient or spouse (vs parent) participating in the study (P < .05 and P = .001); and had higher ED visits in the past year (P = .001). Determinants of higher bombing resource utilization included persons who were female (P = .001); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED (P = .001) or primary care provider (P < .01) visits in past year; and experienced the loss of home or property during a past disaster (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS: Public expectations of hospitals during disasters are high, and some expectations are inappropriate. Better community disaster planning and public risk communication are needed.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The public's expectations of hospital services during disasters may not reflect current hospital disaster plans. The objective of this study was to determine the public's expected hospital service utilization during a pandemic, earthquake, and terrorist bombing.METHODS: A survey was distributed to adult patients or family members at 3 emergency departments (EDs). Participants identified resources and services they expect to need during 3 disaster scenarios. Linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher expected utilization scores for each scenario.RESULTS: Of the 961 people who participated in the study, 66.9% were women, 47.5% were white, and 44.6% were black. Determinants of higher pandemic resource utilization included persons who were younger (P < .01); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED visits (P < .01), hospitalization (P = .001), or fewer primary care provider visits (P = .001) in the past year; and did not have a reunification plan (P < .001). Determinants of higher earthquake resource utilization included persons who were non-white (P < .001); who were a patient or spouse (vs parent) participating in the study (P < .05 and P = .001); and had higher ED visits in the past year (P = .001). Determinants of higher bombing resource utilization included persons who were female (P = .001); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED (P = .001) or primary care provider (P < .01) visits in past year; and experienced the loss of home or property during a past disaster (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS: Public expectations of hospitals during disasters are high, and some expectations are inappropriate. Better community disaster planning and public risk communication are needed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925225705&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925225705&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/dmp.2013.4

DO - 10.1017/dmp.2013.4

M3 - Article

C2 - 24618168

AN - SCOPUS:84925225705

VL - 7

SP - 167

EP - 174

JO - Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness

JF - Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness

SN - 1935-7893

IS - 2

ER -