PTSD and depression after the Madrid March 11 train bombings

Juan J. Miguel-Tobal, Antonio Cano-Vindel, Hector Gonzalez-Ordi, Iciar Iruarrizaga, Sasha Rudenstine, David Vlahov, Sandro Galea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The March 11, 2004, train bombings in Madrid, Spain, caused the largest loss of life from a single terrorist attack in modern European history. We used a cross-sectional random digit dial survey of Madrid residents to assess the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression in the general population of Madrid 1 to 3 months after the March 11 train bombings. Of respondents 2.3% reported symptoms consistent with PTSD related to the March 11 bombings and 8.0% of respondents reported symptoms consistent with major depression. The prevalence of PTSD was substantially lower, but the prevalence of depression was comparable to estimates reported after the September 11 attacks in Manhattan. The findings suggest that across cities, the magnitude of a terrorist attack may be the primary determinant of the prevalence of PTSD in the general population, but other factors may be responsible for determining the population prevalence of depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-80
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Depression
Population
Modern 1601-history
Spain
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Miguel-Tobal, J. J., Cano-Vindel, A., Gonzalez-Ordi, H., Iruarrizaga, I., Rudenstine, S., Vlahov, D., & Galea, S. (2006). PTSD and depression after the Madrid March 11 train bombings. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 19(1), 69-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20091

PTSD and depression after the Madrid March 11 train bombings. / Miguel-Tobal, Juan J.; Cano-Vindel, Antonio; Gonzalez-Ordi, Hector; Iruarrizaga, Iciar; Rudenstine, Sasha; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro.

In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, Vol. 19, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 69-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miguel-Tobal, JJ, Cano-Vindel, A, Gonzalez-Ordi, H, Iruarrizaga, I, Rudenstine, S, Vlahov, D & Galea, S 2006, 'PTSD and depression after the Madrid March 11 train bombings', Journal of Traumatic Stress, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 69-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20091
Miguel-Tobal JJ, Cano-Vindel A, Gonzalez-Ordi H, Iruarrizaga I, Rudenstine S, Vlahov D et al. PTSD and depression after the Madrid March 11 train bombings. Journal of Traumatic Stress. 2006 Feb;19(1):69-80. https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20091
Miguel-Tobal, Juan J. ; Cano-Vindel, Antonio ; Gonzalez-Ordi, Hector ; Iruarrizaga, Iciar ; Rudenstine, Sasha ; Vlahov, David ; Galea, Sandro. / PTSD and depression after the Madrid March 11 train bombings. In: Journal of Traumatic Stress. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 69-80.
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