Psychosocial interventions for alcohol use among problem drug users: Protocol for a feasibility study in primary care

Jan Klimas, Rolande Anderson, Margaret Bourke, Gerard Bury, Catherine Anne Field, Eileen Kaner, Rory Keane, Eamon Keenan, David Meagher, Brian Murphy, Clodagh S M O'Gorman, Thomas P. O'Toole, Jean Saunders, Bobby P. Smyth, Colum Dunne, Walter Cullen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Alcohol use is an important issue among problem drug users. Although screening and brief intervention (SBI) are effective in reducing problem alcohol use in primary care, no research has examined this issue among problem drug users. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine if a complex intervention including SBI for problem alcohol use among problem drug users is feasible and acceptable in practice. This study also aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing the proportion of patients with problem alcohol use. Methods: Psychosocial intervention for alcohol use among problem drug users (PINTA) is a pilot feasibility study of a complex intervention comprising SBI for problem alcohol use among problem drug users with cluster randomization at the level of general practice, integrated qualitative process evaluation, and involving general practices in two socioeconomically deprived regions. Practices (N=16) will be eligible to participate if they are registered to prescribe methadone and/or at least 10 patients of the practice are currently receiving addiction treatment. Patient must meet the following inclusion criteria to participate in this study: 18 years of age or older, receiving addiction treatment/care (eg, methadone), or known to be a problem drug user. This study is based on a complex intervention supporting SBI for problem alcohol use among problem drug users (experimental group) compared to an "assessment-only" control group. Control practices will be provided with a delayed intervention after follow-up. Primary outcomes of the study are feasibility and acceptability of the intervention to patients and practitioners. Secondary outcome includes the effectiveness of the intervention on care process (documented rates of SBI) and outcome (proportion of patients with problem alcohol use at the follow-up). A stratified random sampling method will be used to select general practices based on the level of training for providing addiction-related care and geographical area. In this study, general practitioners and practice staff, researchers, and trainers will not be blinded to treatment, but patients and remote randomizers will be unaware of the treatment. Results: This study is ongoing and a protocol system is being developed for the study. This study may inform future research among the high-risk population of problem drug users by providing initial indications as to whether psychosocial interventions for problem alcohol use are feasible, acceptable, and also effective among problem drug users attending primary care. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine the feasibility and acceptability of complex intervention in primary care to enhance alcohol SBI among problem drug users. Results of this study will inform future research among this high-risk population and guide policy and service development locally and internationally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere26
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Brief intervention
  • Complex intervention
  • General practice
  • Methadone maintenance
  • Primary health care
  • Screening
  • Substance-related disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

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