Psychosocial health of living kidney donors: A systematic review

K. K. Clemens, Heather Thiessen Philbrook, Chirag Parikh, R. C. Yang, M. L. Karley, N. Boudville, G. V. Ramesh Prasad, A. X. Garg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Knowledge of the psychosocial benefits and harms faced by living kidney donors is necessary for informed consent and follow-up. We reviewed any English language study where psychosocial function was assessed using questionnaires in 10 or more donors after nephrectomy. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Psych INFO, Sociological Abstracts and CINAHL databases and reviewed reference lists from 1969 through July 2006. Independently, two reviewers abstracted data on study, donor and control group characteristics, psychosocial measurements and their outcomes. Fifty-one studies examined 5139 donors who were assessed an average of 4 years after nephrectomy. The majority experienced no depression (77-95%) or anxiety (86-94%), with questionnaire scores similar to controls. The majority reported no change or an improved relationship with their recipient (86-100%), spouse (82-98%), family members (83-100%) and nonrecipient children (95-100%). Some experienced an increase in self-esteem. A majority (83-93%) expressed no change in their attractiveness. Although many scored high on quality of life measures, some prospective studies described a decrease after donation. A small proportion of donors had adverse psychosocial outcomes. Most kidney donors experience no change or an improvement in their psychosocial health after donation. Harms may be minimized through careful selection and follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2965-2977
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Living Donors
Tissue Donors
Kidney
Health
Nephrectomy
Informed Consent
Spouses
Self Concept
MEDLINE
Language
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Databases
Prospective Studies
Depression
Control Groups
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Living kidney donors
  • Quality of life
  • Systematic review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Psychosocial health of living kidney donors : A systematic review. / Clemens, K. K.; Thiessen Philbrook, Heather; Parikh, Chirag; Yang, R. C.; Karley, M. L.; Boudville, N.; Ramesh Prasad, G. V.; Garg, A. X.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 6, No. 12, 01.12.2006, p. 2965-2977.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Clemens, KK, Thiessen Philbrook, H, Parikh, C, Yang, RC, Karley, ML, Boudville, N, Ramesh Prasad, GV & Garg, AX 2006, 'Psychosocial health of living kidney donors: A systematic review', American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 2965-2977. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2006.01567.x
Clemens, K. K. ; Thiessen Philbrook, Heather ; Parikh, Chirag ; Yang, R. C. ; Karley, M. L. ; Boudville, N. ; Ramesh Prasad, G. V. ; Garg, A. X. / Psychosocial health of living kidney donors : A systematic review. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2006 ; Vol. 6, No. 12. pp. 2965-2977.
@article{4b4e1e47d2f84c20aa2f3d1b17e2bcf3,
title = "Psychosocial health of living kidney donors: A systematic review",
abstract = "Knowledge of the psychosocial benefits and harms faced by living kidney donors is necessary for informed consent and follow-up. We reviewed any English language study where psychosocial function was assessed using questionnaires in 10 or more donors after nephrectomy. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Psych INFO, Sociological Abstracts and CINAHL databases and reviewed reference lists from 1969 through July 2006. Independently, two reviewers abstracted data on study, donor and control group characteristics, psychosocial measurements and their outcomes. Fifty-one studies examined 5139 donors who were assessed an average of 4 years after nephrectomy. The majority experienced no depression (77-95{\%}) or anxiety (86-94{\%}), with questionnaire scores similar to controls. The majority reported no change or an improved relationship with their recipient (86-100{\%}), spouse (82-98{\%}), family members (83-100{\%}) and nonrecipient children (95-100{\%}). Some experienced an increase in self-esteem. A majority (83-93{\%}) expressed no change in their attractiveness. Although many scored high on quality of life measures, some prospective studies described a decrease after donation. A small proportion of donors had adverse psychosocial outcomes. Most kidney donors experience no change or an improvement in their psychosocial health after donation. Harms may be minimized through careful selection and follow-up.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Depression, Living kidney donors, Quality of life, Systematic review",
author = "Clemens, {K. K.} and {Thiessen Philbrook}, Heather and Chirag Parikh and Yang, {R. C.} and Karley, {M. L.} and N. Boudville and {Ramesh Prasad}, {G. V.} and Garg, {A. X.}",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1600-6143.2006.01567.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "2965--2977",
journal = "American Journal of Transplantation",
issn = "1600-6135",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychosocial health of living kidney donors

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Clemens, K. K.

AU - Thiessen Philbrook, Heather

AU - Parikh, Chirag

AU - Yang, R. C.

AU - Karley, M. L.

AU - Boudville, N.

AU - Ramesh Prasad, G. V.

AU - Garg, A. X.

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - Knowledge of the psychosocial benefits and harms faced by living kidney donors is necessary for informed consent and follow-up. We reviewed any English language study where psychosocial function was assessed using questionnaires in 10 or more donors after nephrectomy. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Psych INFO, Sociological Abstracts and CINAHL databases and reviewed reference lists from 1969 through July 2006. Independently, two reviewers abstracted data on study, donor and control group characteristics, psychosocial measurements and their outcomes. Fifty-one studies examined 5139 donors who were assessed an average of 4 years after nephrectomy. The majority experienced no depression (77-95%) or anxiety (86-94%), with questionnaire scores similar to controls. The majority reported no change or an improved relationship with their recipient (86-100%), spouse (82-98%), family members (83-100%) and nonrecipient children (95-100%). Some experienced an increase in self-esteem. A majority (83-93%) expressed no change in their attractiveness. Although many scored high on quality of life measures, some prospective studies described a decrease after donation. A small proportion of donors had adverse psychosocial outcomes. Most kidney donors experience no change or an improvement in their psychosocial health after donation. Harms may be minimized through careful selection and follow-up.

AB - Knowledge of the psychosocial benefits and harms faced by living kidney donors is necessary for informed consent and follow-up. We reviewed any English language study where psychosocial function was assessed using questionnaires in 10 or more donors after nephrectomy. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, Psych INFO, Sociological Abstracts and CINAHL databases and reviewed reference lists from 1969 through July 2006. Independently, two reviewers abstracted data on study, donor and control group characteristics, psychosocial measurements and their outcomes. Fifty-one studies examined 5139 donors who were assessed an average of 4 years after nephrectomy. The majority experienced no depression (77-95%) or anxiety (86-94%), with questionnaire scores similar to controls. The majority reported no change or an improved relationship with their recipient (86-100%), spouse (82-98%), family members (83-100%) and nonrecipient children (95-100%). Some experienced an increase in self-esteem. A majority (83-93%) expressed no change in their attractiveness. Although many scored high on quality of life measures, some prospective studies described a decrease after donation. A small proportion of donors had adverse psychosocial outcomes. Most kidney donors experience no change or an improvement in their psychosocial health after donation. Harms may be minimized through careful selection and follow-up.

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - Living kidney donors

KW - Quality of life

KW - Systematic review

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33751197519&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33751197519&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2006.01567.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2006.01567.x

M3 - Review article

C2 - 17294524

AN - SCOPUS:33751197519

VL - 6

SP - 2965

EP - 2977

JO - American Journal of Transplantation

JF - American Journal of Transplantation

SN - 1600-6135

IS - 12

ER -