Psychosocial factors and the risk of myocardial infarctions in white women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The relationship of risk of myocardial infarction (MI) to psychosocial factors was studied retrospectively in 107 white women hospitalized with first MI's and in 218 controls hospitalized for other diseases. Medical records were abstracted and the women were interviewed. Psychosocial factors associated with MI were educational discrepancy, in which the patient had less education than her husband, household crowding and late birth order. Educational discrepancy was independently associated with MI, but household crowding and birth order seemed to act as risk factors for MI only when certain biological risk factors were also present. The findings indicate that certain psychosocial factors related to risk of MI in white males are also risk factors for MI in white females especially in association with biologic risk factors. Thus the effects of certain psychosocial factors may assume clinical importance only when interacting with an underlying disease state as indicated by the presence of major biologic risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-320
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume103
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1976
Externally publishedYes

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Myocardial Infarction
Psychology
Biological Factors
Crowding
Birth Order
Spouses
Medical Records
Education

Keywords

  • Coronary heart disease
  • Myocardial infarctions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Psychosocial factors and the risk of myocardial infarctions in white women. / Szklo, Moyses; Tonascia, James A; Gordis, Leon.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 103, No. 3, 03.1976, p. 312-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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