Psychosocial consequences of weight cycling

Susan J. Bartlett, Thomas A. Wadden, Renée A. Vogt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Participants were 130 obese women with a mean age of 41.1 ± 8.4 years and a mean weight of 97.9 ± 13.5 kg, who reported having undertaken a mean lifetime total of 4.7 ± 1.2 major diets on which they had lost a mean total of 45.9 ± 21.4 kg. Participants with a severe history of weight cycling had a significantly younger age of onset of their obesity than did mild cyclers and reported initiating dieting at a significantly younger age and lower weight. No evidence, however, was found that weight cycling was associated with greater reports of depression or other psychopathology; nor was it associated with a significantly greater frequency of binge eating disorder. The results are discussed in terms of the need to use additional measures of psychological functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)587-592
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Weights and Measures
Binge-Eating Disorder
Psychopathology
Age of Onset
Obesity
Depression
Psychology
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Psychosocial consequences of weight cycling. / Bartlett, Susan J.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Vogt, Renée A.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 64, No. 3, 06.1996, p. 587-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bartlett, Susan J. ; Wadden, Thomas A. ; Vogt, Renée A. / Psychosocial consequences of weight cycling. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1996 ; Vol. 64, No. 3. pp. 587-592.
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