Psychometric properties of the obsessive compulsive inventory: Child version in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder

Anna M. Jones, Alessandro S. De Nadai, Elysse B. Arnold, Joseph F. McGuire, Adam B. Lewin, Tanya K. Murphy, Eric A. Storch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The psychometric properties of the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Child Version (OCI-CV) were examined in ninety-six youth with a primary/co-primary diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A confirmatory factor analysis revealed an acceptable model of fit with factors consisting of doubting/checking, obsessing, hoarding, washing, ordering, and neutralizing. The internal consistency of the OCI-CV total score was good, while internal consistency for subscale scores ranged from poor to good. The OCI-CV was modestly correlated with obsessive-compulsive symptom severity on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) Severity Scale, as well as with clinician-reported OCD severity. All OCI-CV subscales significantly correlated with the corresponding CY-BOCS Symptom Checklist dimension. The OCI-CV significantly correlated with child-reported depressive symptoms and OCD-related functional impairment, but was not significantly correlated with parent-reported irritability or clinician-reported overall functioning. Taken together, these data suggest the psychometric properties of the OCI-CV are adequate for assessing obsessive-compulsive symptom presence among youth with OCD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-151
Number of pages15
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Children
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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