Psychometric properties of the children's Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale in youth with autism spectrum disorders and obsessive-compulsive symptoms

Monica S. Wu, Joseph F. McGuire, Elysse B. Arnold, Adam B. Lewin, Tanya K. Murphy, Eric A. Storch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The psychometric properties of the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) were investigated in 46 treatment-seeking youth, 7-15 years of age, who were diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and exhibited obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The CY-BOCS Total score exhibited good internal consistency, with differing internal consistencies observed on the Obsession Severity scale (α = 0.86) and Compulsion Severity scale (α = 0.59). Good to excellent inter-rater reliability was observed for the CY-BOCS Total score and both Severity scales. Convergent and divergent validity of the CY-BOCS Total score and both Severity scales were satisfactory. Insight into obsessive-compulsive symptoms was moderately associated with the CY-BOCS Total score. The CY-BOCS demonstrated treatment sensitivity, demonstrating significant changes in obsessive-compulsive symptoms within a subsample of youth receiving cognitive-behavioral treatment. Overall, the CY-BOCS demonstrated adequate psychometric properties and utility in assessing obsessive-compulsive symptoms in youth with ASD and clinically significant obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-211
Number of pages11
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Children
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Reliability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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