Psychological, Social, and Health Impact of Caregiving: A Comparison of Black and White Dementia Family Caregivers and Noncaregivers

William E. Haley, Constance A.C. West, Virginia G. Wadley, Greg R. Ford, Faye A. White, John J. Barrett, Lindy E. Harrell, David L. Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Psychological, social, and health variables were compared in 175 Black and White family caregivers of patients with dementia and 175 Black and White noncaregivers. Caregivers and noncaregivers did not differ within race on demographic variables. Caregiving was associated with increased depression and decreased life satisfaction only in White families. However, caregiving appears to have similar social consequences for Black and White families, including restriction of social activity and increased visits and support by family from outside of the home. Race, but not caregiving, was associated with physical health variables. Methodological issues in comparing well-being in Black and White caregivers, in particular the importance of including noncaregiving comparison subjects, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)540-552
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology and aging
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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