Psychological and physical predictors of illness intrusiveness in patients with multiple sclerosis

Stacey Snyder, Frederick W. Foley, Eileen Farrell, Meghan Beier, Vance Zemon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Physical disability as well as psychological factors may contribute to illness intrusiveness. The aim of this study was to determine if level of disability, anxiety, and depression predicted illness intrusiveness in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second aim of this study was to determine if anxiety and depression moderated the impact of disability on illness intrusiveness. MS (N = 185) patients were recruited from a MS outpatient clinic that was part of a major medical center in New Jersey. Hierarchical linear regressions demonstrated that disability, anxiety, and depression each independently predicted illness intrusiveness. Anxiety and depression were not shown to moderate the impact of disability on illness intrusiveness. Implications of results from the first aim suggest that reducing psychological distress such as anxiety and depression may also reduce illness intrusiveness in patients with MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-44
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume332
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Multiple Sclerosis
Anxiety
Depression
Psychology
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Disability
  • Illness intrusiveness
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Psychological and physical predictors of illness intrusiveness in patients with multiple sclerosis. / Snyder, Stacey; Foley, Frederick W.; Farrell, Eileen; Beier, Meghan; Zemon, Vance.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 332, No. 1-2, 15.09.2013, p. 41-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Snyder, Stacey ; Foley, Frederick W. ; Farrell, Eileen ; Beier, Meghan ; Zemon, Vance. / Psychological and physical predictors of illness intrusiveness in patients with multiple sclerosis. In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 332, No. 1-2. pp. 41-44.
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