Psychological and cognitive determinants of vision function in age-related macular degeneration

Barry W. Rovner, Robin J. Casten, Robert W Massof, Benjamin E. Leiby, William S. Tasman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effect of coping strategies, depression, physical health, and cognition on National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire scores obtained at baseline in a sample of older patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) enrolled in the Improving Function in AMD Trial, a randomized controlled clinical trial that compares the efficacy of problemsolving therapy with that of supportive therapy to improve vision function in patients with AMD. Methods: Baseline evaluation of 241 older outpatients with advanced AMD who were enrolled in a clinical trial testing the efficacy of a behavioral intervention to improve vision function. Vision function was characterized as an interval-scaled, latent variable of visual ability based on the near-vision subscale of the National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire-25 plus Supplement. Results: Visual ability was highly correlated with visual acuity. However, amultivariate model revealed that patient coping strategies and cognitive function contributed to their ability to perform near-vision activities independent of visual acuity. Conclusions: Patients with AMD vary in their coping strategies and cognitive function and in their visual acuity, and that variability determines patients' self-report of vision function. Understanding patient coping mechanisms and cognition may help increase the precision of vision rating scales and suggest new interventions to improve vision function and quality of life in patients with AMD. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00572039

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-890
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume129
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Macular Degeneration
Psychology
Cognition
Aptitude
National Eye Institute (U.S.)
Visual Acuity
Self Report
Outpatients
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Clinical Trials
Depression
Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Psychological and cognitive determinants of vision function in age-related macular degeneration. / Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Massof, Robert W; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Tasman, William S.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 129, No. 7, 07.2011, p. 885-890.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rovner, Barry W. ; Casten, Robin J. ; Massof, Robert W ; Leiby, Benjamin E. ; Tasman, William S. / Psychological and cognitive determinants of vision function in age-related macular degeneration. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 2011 ; Vol. 129, No. 7. pp. 885-890.
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