Psychiatric medication use among Manhattan residents following the World Trade Center disaster

Joseph A. Boscarino, Sandro Galea, Jennifer Ahern, Heidi Resnick, David Vlahov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    To assess medication use in New York after the September 11th attacks, a telephone survey was conducted in October 2001 (N = 1,008). The prevalence of psychiatric medication use 30 days before the disaster was 8.9 and 11.6% 30 days after, a small but significant increase. The most important factor predicting postdisaster use was predisaster use - 92% of those who used medications postdisaster used them predisaster. In addition, 3.3% used psychiatric medications 30 days postdisaster, but not 30 days before. Those who had panic attacks, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and insurance coverage, were the most likely medicated (26.5%). However, among those who used postdisaster medications (n = 129), new users tended to be those with panic attacks (44.1%) and those with panic attacks and PTSD (69.2%).

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)301-306
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
    Volume16
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 2003

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    Panic Disorder
    Disasters
    Psychiatry
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
    Insurance Coverage
    Telephone

    Keywords

    • Disasters
    • Panic attack
    • Pharmaceuticals
    • Posttraumatic stress disorder
    • Service utilization

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Psychology(all)
    • Clinical Psychology

    Cite this

    Psychiatric medication use among Manhattan residents following the World Trade Center disaster. / Boscarino, Joseph A.; Galea, Sandro; Ahern, Jennifer; Resnick, Heidi; Vlahov, David.

    In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2003, p. 301-306.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Boscarino, Joseph A. ; Galea, Sandro ; Ahern, Jennifer ; Resnick, Heidi ; Vlahov, David. / Psychiatric medication use among Manhattan residents following the World Trade Center disaster. In: Journal of Traumatic Stress. 2003 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 301-306.
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