Provision of community-wide benefits in public health intervention research: The experience of investigators conducting research in the community setting in south asia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This article describes the types of community-wide benefits provided by investigators conducting public health research in South Asia as well as their self-reported reasons for providing such benefits. Methods: We conducted 52 in-depth interviews to explore how public health investigators in low-resource settings make decisions about the delivery of ancillary care to research subjects. In 39 of the interviews respondents described providing benefits to members of the community in which they conducted their study. We returned to our narrative dataset to find answers to two questions: What types of community-wide benefits do researchers provide when conducting public health intervention studies in the community setting, and what reasons do researchers give when asked why they provided community-wide benefits? Findings: The types of community-wide benefits delivered were directed to the health and well-being of the population. The most common types of benefits delivered were the facilitation of access to health care for individuals in acute medical need and emergency response to natural disasters. Respondents' self-reported reasons when asked why they provided such benefits fell into 2 general categories: intrinsic importance and instrumental importance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalDeveloping World Bioethics
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

South Asia
Public Health
public health
Research Personnel
Research
community
experience
Interviews
Research Subjects
Health Services Accessibility
Disasters
interview
natural disaster
Emergencies
well-being
health care
narrative
Health
health
resources

Keywords

  • Empirical ethics
  • Research ethics
  • Special obligations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

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title = "Provision of community-wide benefits in public health intervention research: The experience of investigators conducting research in the community setting in south asia",
abstract = "Background: This article describes the types of community-wide benefits provided by investigators conducting public health research in South Asia as well as their self-reported reasons for providing such benefits. Methods: We conducted 52 in-depth interviews to explore how public health investigators in low-resource settings make decisions about the delivery of ancillary care to research subjects. In 39 of the interviews respondents described providing benefits to members of the community in which they conducted their study. We returned to our narrative dataset to find answers to two questions: What types of community-wide benefits do researchers provide when conducting public health intervention studies in the community setting, and what reasons do researchers give when asked why they provided community-wide benefits? Findings: The types of community-wide benefits delivered were directed to the health and well-being of the population. The most common types of benefits delivered were the facilitation of access to health care for individuals in acute medical need and emergency response to natural disasters. Respondents' self-reported reasons when asked why they provided such benefits fell into 2 general categories: intrinsic importance and instrumental importance.",
keywords = "Empirical ethics, Research ethics, Special obligations",
author = "Holly Taylor and Maria Merritt",
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