Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings

Edward J. Mills, Nathan Ford, Sonal Singh, Oghenowede Eyawo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There has been an historic expectation that delivering combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to populations affected by violent conflict is untenable due to population movement and separation of drug supplies. There is now emerging evidence that cART provision can be successful in these populations. Using examples from Médecins Sans Frontières experience in a variety of African settings and also local nongovernmental organizations' experiences in northern Uganda, we examine novel approaches that have ensured retention in programs and adequate adherence. Emerging guidelines from United Nations bodies now support the expansion of cART in settings of conflict.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-209
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent HIV/AIDS Reports
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Population
Uganda
United Nations
Therapeutics
Organizations
Guidelines
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings. / Mills, Edward J.; Ford, Nathan; Singh, Sonal; Eyawo, Oghenowede.

In: Current HIV/AIDS Reports, Vol. 6, No. 4, 11.2009, p. 201-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mills, EJ, Ford, N, Singh, S & Eyawo, O 2009, 'Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings', Current HIV/AIDS Reports, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 201-209. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11904-009-0027-7
Mills, Edward J. ; Ford, Nathan ; Singh, Sonal ; Eyawo, Oghenowede. / Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings. In: Current HIV/AIDS Reports. 2009 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 201-209.
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