Providers' perceived barriers to sexually transmitted disease care in 2 large health maintenance organizations

Hayley Mark, Kathleen Irwin, Maya Sternberg, Lynda Anderson, David Magid, Michael Stiffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

GOAL: To identify providers' perceived barriers to sexually transmitted disease (STD) care in 2 health plans and plan-, clinician-, and patient-level factors that were associated with these barriers in order to inform quality improvement interventions. STUDY DESIGN: Surveys were mailed to a stratified sample of 1000 physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners at 2 large health plans in 1999-2000. Of the 743 (82%) providers who received questionnaires and responded, data were analyzed from 699 with complete specialty information. RESULTS: Ninety-five percent of providers identified at least 1 barrier to STD care. The most commonly cited barriers in both plans related to insufficient time and staff to address STDs, to counsel patients or manage sex partners, to keep current with managing high-risk patients, and to monitor patient adherence to recommendations to abstain from sex or use condoms during treatment. Nurse practitioners and specialists in obstetrics and gynecology were more likely to cite these barriers. Providers in staff models were more likely to cite the most common patient-level barriers. Few cited barriers related to diagnostic and treatment services. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions in health plans are necessary to address constraints related to time and staff performing STD related care, keeping current with managing high-risk patients, and supporting patient adherence to provider recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-189
Number of pages6
JournalSexually transmitted diseases
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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