Protein intake and muscle strength in older persons: Does inflammation matter?

Benedetta Bartali, Edward A. Frongillo, Martha H. Stipanuk, Stefania Bandinelli, Simonetta Salvini, Domenico Palli, Jose A. Morais, Stefano Volpato, Jack M. Guralnik, Luigi Ferrucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives To examine whether protein intake is associated with change in muscle strength in older persons. Because systemic inflammation has been associated with protein catabolism, the study also evaluated whether a synergistic effect exists between protein intake and inflammatory markers on change in muscle strength. Design Longitudinal. Setting The Invecchiare in Chianti Study. Participants Five hundred and ninety-eight older adults. Measurements Knee extension strength was measured at baseline (1998-2000) and during 3-year follow-up (2001-2003) using a handheld dynamometer. Protein intake was assessed using a detailed food frequency questionnaire. The inflammatory markers examined were C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Results The main effect of protein intake on change in muscle strength was not significant. However, a significant interaction was found between protein intake and CRP (P =.003), IL-6 (P =.049), and TNF-α (P =.02), indicating that lower protein intake was associated with greater decline in muscle strength in persons with high levels of inflammatory markers. Conclusion Lower protein intake was associated with decline in muscle strength in persons with high levels of inflammatory markers. These results may help to understand the factors contributing to decline in muscle strength with aging and to identify the target population of older persons who may benefit from nutritional interventions aimed at preventing or reducing age-associated muscle impairments and its detrimental consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-484
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Muscle Strength
Inflammation
Proteins
C-Reactive Protein
Interleukin-6
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Health Services Needs and Demand
Protein C
Knee
Food
Muscles

Keywords

  • inflammatory markers
  • muscle strength
  • protein intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Bartali, B., Frongillo, E. A., Stipanuk, M. H., Bandinelli, S., Salvini, S., Palli, D., ... Ferrucci, L. (2012). Protein intake and muscle strength in older persons: Does inflammation matter? Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 60(3), 480-484. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03833.x

Protein intake and muscle strength in older persons : Does inflammation matter? / Bartali, Benedetta; Frongillo, Edward A.; Stipanuk, Martha H.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Salvini, Simonetta; Palli, Domenico; Morais, Jose A.; Volpato, Stefano; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 60, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 480-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bartali, B, Frongillo, EA, Stipanuk, MH, Bandinelli, S, Salvini, S, Palli, D, Morais, JA, Volpato, S, Guralnik, JM & Ferrucci, L 2012, 'Protein intake and muscle strength in older persons: Does inflammation matter?', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 480-484. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03833.x
Bartali, Benedetta ; Frongillo, Edward A. ; Stipanuk, Martha H. ; Bandinelli, Stefania ; Salvini, Simonetta ; Palli, Domenico ; Morais, Jose A. ; Volpato, Stefano ; Guralnik, Jack M. ; Ferrucci, Luigi. / Protein intake and muscle strength in older persons : Does inflammation matter?. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2012 ; Vol. 60, No. 3. pp. 480-484.
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