Prostate Cancer in the Baby Boomer Generation

Results from CaPSURE

Charles D. Scales, Judd W. Moul, Lesley H. Curtis, Eric P. Elkin, Mary Elizabeth Hughes, Peter R. Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Baby Boomers (those born in 1946 to 1964) are thought to place a high value on quality of life, and have a higher propensity to consume healthcare services than previous generations. We sought to characterize prostate cancer (CaP) presentation among this group, and determine whether treatment patterns differ between Baby Boomers and the preceding generation. Methods: We defined two birth cohorts: men born in 1927 to 1945 (pre-Boomers) and Baby Boomers. Our study cohort included men less than 65 years old, diagnosed with CaP between 1999 and 2003 (Baby Boomers, n = 812; pre-Boomers, n = 1843). We compared the two groups for clinical presentation, sociodemographics, and primary treatment, controlling for age effects. The primary endpoint was selection of radical prostatectomy as primary treatment. Results: Most Baby Boomers were diagnosed with stage T1 disease (466, 61%), biopsy Gleason sums less than 7 (572, 73%), and prostate-specific antigen levels of 4.1 to 10.0 (509, 66%). This presentation was not clinically different from pre-Boomers. Baby Boomers had higher socioeconomic status than pre-Boomers. On multivariate analysis, Baby Boomers were more likely to undergo radical prostatectomy as primary therapy (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 2.35). Controlling for age effects, however, there were no significant differences in treatment choice (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.87) or sociodemographics between these groups. Conclusions: Differences in CaP presentation and treatment between Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers may be related to age at diagnosis rather than innate differences in behavior. As more Baby Boomers are diagnosed with CaP, further research will be required to characterize this generation's impact on CaP care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1162-1167
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Prostatectomy
Therapeutics
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Social Class
Cohort Studies
Multivariate Analysis
Quality of Life
Parturition
Delivery of Health Care
Biopsy
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Scales, C. D., Moul, J. W., Curtis, L. H., Elkin, E. P., Hughes, M. E., & Carroll, P. R. (2007). Prostate Cancer in the Baby Boomer Generation: Results from CaPSURE. Urology, 70(6), 1162-1167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2007.08.011

Prostate Cancer in the Baby Boomer Generation : Results from CaPSURE. / Scales, Charles D.; Moul, Judd W.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Elkin, Eric P.; Hughes, Mary Elizabeth; Carroll, Peter R.

In: Urology, Vol. 70, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 1162-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scales, CD, Moul, JW, Curtis, LH, Elkin, EP, Hughes, ME & Carroll, PR 2007, 'Prostate Cancer in the Baby Boomer Generation: Results from CaPSURE', Urology, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 1162-1167. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2007.08.011
Scales, Charles D. ; Moul, Judd W. ; Curtis, Lesley H. ; Elkin, Eric P. ; Hughes, Mary Elizabeth ; Carroll, Peter R. / Prostate Cancer in the Baby Boomer Generation : Results from CaPSURE. In: Urology. 2007 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 1162-1167.
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abstract = "Objectives: Baby Boomers (those born in 1946 to 1964) are thought to place a high value on quality of life, and have a higher propensity to consume healthcare services than previous generations. We sought to characterize prostate cancer (CaP) presentation among this group, and determine whether treatment patterns differ between Baby Boomers and the preceding generation. Methods: We defined two birth cohorts: men born in 1927 to 1945 (pre-Boomers) and Baby Boomers. Our study cohort included men less than 65 years old, diagnosed with CaP between 1999 and 2003 (Baby Boomers, n = 812; pre-Boomers, n = 1843). We compared the two groups for clinical presentation, sociodemographics, and primary treatment, controlling for age effects. The primary endpoint was selection of radical prostatectomy as primary treatment. Results: Most Baby Boomers were diagnosed with stage T1 disease (466, 61{\%}), biopsy Gleason sums less than 7 (572, 73{\%}), and prostate-specific antigen levels of 4.1 to 10.0 (509, 66{\%}). This presentation was not clinically different from pre-Boomers. Baby Boomers had higher socioeconomic status than pre-Boomers. On multivariate analysis, Baby Boomers were more likely to undergo radical prostatectomy as primary therapy (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 2.35). Controlling for age effects, however, there were no significant differences in treatment choice (OR 0.86, 95{\%} CI 0.40 to 1.87) or sociodemographics between these groups. Conclusions: Differences in CaP presentation and treatment between Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers may be related to age at diagnosis rather than innate differences in behavior. As more Baby Boomers are diagnosed with CaP, further research will be required to characterize this generation's impact on CaP care.",
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AB - Objectives: Baby Boomers (those born in 1946 to 1964) are thought to place a high value on quality of life, and have a higher propensity to consume healthcare services than previous generations. We sought to characterize prostate cancer (CaP) presentation among this group, and determine whether treatment patterns differ between Baby Boomers and the preceding generation. Methods: We defined two birth cohorts: men born in 1927 to 1945 (pre-Boomers) and Baby Boomers. Our study cohort included men less than 65 years old, diagnosed with CaP between 1999 and 2003 (Baby Boomers, n = 812; pre-Boomers, n = 1843). We compared the two groups for clinical presentation, sociodemographics, and primary treatment, controlling for age effects. The primary endpoint was selection of radical prostatectomy as primary treatment. Results: Most Baby Boomers were diagnosed with stage T1 disease (466, 61%), biopsy Gleason sums less than 7 (572, 73%), and prostate-specific antigen levels of 4.1 to 10.0 (509, 66%). This presentation was not clinically different from pre-Boomers. Baby Boomers had higher socioeconomic status than pre-Boomers. On multivariate analysis, Baby Boomers were more likely to undergo radical prostatectomy as primary therapy (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 2.35). Controlling for age effects, however, there were no significant differences in treatment choice (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.87) or sociodemographics between these groups. Conclusions: Differences in CaP presentation and treatment between Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers may be related to age at diagnosis rather than innate differences in behavior. As more Baby Boomers are diagnosed with CaP, further research will be required to characterize this generation's impact on CaP care.

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