Prospective slice-by-slice motion correction reduces false positive activations in fMRI with task-correlated motion

J. Schulz, T. Siegert, P. L. Bazin, J. Maclaren, M. Herbst, M. Zaitsev, R. Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to test the hypothesis that slice-by-slice prospective motion correction at 7. T using an optical tracking system reduces the rate of false positive activations in an fMRI group study with a paradigm that involves task-correlated motion. Materials and methods: Brain activation during right leg movement was measured using a block design on 15 volunteers, with and without prospective motion correction. Clearly erroneous activations were compared between both cases, at the individual level. Additionally, conventional group analysis was performed. Results: The number of falsely activated voxels with T-values higher than 5 was reduced by 48% using prospective motion correction alone, without additional retrospective realignment. In the group analysis, the statistical power was increased - the peak T-value was 26% greater, and the number of voxels in the cluster representing the right leg was increased by a factor of 9.3. Conclusion: Slice-by-slice prospective motion correction in fMRI studies with task-correlated motion can substantially reduce false positive activations and increase statistical power.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)124-132
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroImage
Volume84
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • FMRI
  • False positive activations
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Optical motion tracking
  • Prospective motion correction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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