Prospective, randomized trial of nasogastric suction in patients with acute pancreatitis

Michael G. Sarr, Hilary Sanfey, John L Cameron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The efficacy of nasogastric (NG) suction was evaluated in a prospective, randomized trial in 60 patients with acute pancreatitis of mild to moderate severity. Group I, NG (29 patients) was treated with NG suction, and group II, no NG (31 patients) was treated without NG suction. The presentation, cause of pancreatitis, and clinical parameters at the time of admission of the two groups were similar. The use of NG suction had no discernible benefit during hospitalization. There were no differences in duration of abdominal pain, the interval until bowel sounds returned, the need for narcotic administration, or the length of time intravenous fluid therapy was needed. When compared with group II, no NG, patients in group I, NG tended to resume oral intake later (5.0 ± 0.3 versus 3.9 ± 0.5 days) and remain hospitalized longer (13.1 ± 2.6 versus 10.7 ± 2.0 days). The incidence of serious complications, such as pancreatic abscess, pseudocyst, biliary obstruction, or pulmonary failure, was no different between the groups. This study demonstrates that the routine use of NG suction in patients with acute pancreatitis of mild to moderate severity is of no benefit in altering the clinical course.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)500-504
Number of pages5
JournalSurgery
Volume100
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1986

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Suction
Pancreatitis
Pancreatic Pseudocyst
Fluid Therapy
Narcotics
Abscess
Abdominal Pain
Hospitalization
Lung
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Prospective, randomized trial of nasogastric suction in patients with acute pancreatitis. / Sarr, Michael G.; Sanfey, Hilary; Cameron, John L.

In: Surgery, Vol. 100, No. 3, 1986, p. 500-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sarr, Michael G. ; Sanfey, Hilary ; Cameron, John L. / Prospective, randomized trial of nasogastric suction in patients with acute pancreatitis. In: Surgery. 1986 ; Vol. 100, No. 3. pp. 500-504.
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